Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Human vaccine used to cure prostate cancer in mice

Date:
June 20, 2011
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Scientists cured well-established prostate tumors in mice using a human vaccine with no apparent side effects. This novel cancer treatment approach encourages the immune system to rid itself of prostate tumors without assistance from toxic chemotherapies and radiation treatments. Such a treatment model could some day help people to live tumor free with fewer side effects than those experienced from current therapies.

This photomicrograph revealed histopathologic changes indicative of adenocarcinoma, of the prostate.
Credit: CDC/Dr. Edwin P. Ewing, Jr.

Mayo Clinic investigators and collaborators from the United Kingdom cured well-established prostate tumors in mice using a human vaccine with no apparent side effects. This novel cancer treatment approach encourages the immune system to rid itself of prostate tumors without assistance from toxic chemotherapies and radiation treatments. Such a treatment model could some day help people to live tumor free with fewer side effects than those experienced from current therapies.

Related Articles


The findings appear in the journal Nature Medicine.

"We are hopeful that this will overcome some of the major hurdles which we have seen with immunotherapy cancer research," says Richard Vile, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic immunologist, Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation Professor and a lead author of the study. Clinical trials could begin within two years.

Mayo's immunotherapy research led by Dr. Vile already shows promise in treating prostate cancer and melanoma. It also is a prime candidate for treatment of many more aggressive cancers, such as lung, brain and pancreatic cancer.

Among the team's findings: no trace of autoimmune diseases in the mice. The murine T-cells attacked only cancerous prostate cells, leaving the healthy tissue unharmed.

To develop this new approach, geneticists assembled snippets of genetic code from healthy human prostate tissue into a complementary DNA (cDNA) library. These bits of cDNA were then inserted into a swarm of vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV), which were cultured and reintroduced into the test mice as a vaccine during a series of intravenous injections.

Development of comprehensive cDNA libraries from healthy human prostate tissue represents the key to successful immunotherapy. All infections, allergens and tissues, including tumors, have a unique fingerprint called an antigen -- a molecular protein tag that triggers a response from the body's immune system. Dr. Vile deployed the human vaccine prostate cancer antigens through the mutated VSV vector to raise a full-on assault from the mice's T-cells. After exposure to the mutated viruses, the animals' immune systems recognized the antigens expressed in the virus and produced a potent immune response to attack the prostate tumors.

"Nobody really knows how many antigens the immune system can really see on tumor cells," says Dr. Vile. "By expressing all of these proteins in highly immunogenic viruses, we increased their visibility to the immune system. The immune system now thinks it is being invaded by the viruses, which are expressing cancer-related antigens that should be eliminated."

Previous attempts to vaccinate against prostate and other types of cancerous tumors have been hampered largely by researchers' inability to isolate a sufficiently diverse and robust collection of antigens in tumor cells. Because of this, tumors often mutate and re-establish themselves in spite of the body's immune system.

The use of viruses as vectors for cDNA libraries overcomes the difficulty of isolating antigens in tumor cells by giving the immune system a more complete picture of the cancerous invader.

This study was a Mayo collaboration with Alan Melcher, Ph.D., and Peter Selby, Ph.D., both from the Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre at St. James' University Hospital and professors at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, UK.

Co-authors of the article are: Timothy Kottke; Jose Pulido, M.D.; Feorillo Galivo, Ph.D.; Jill Thompson; Phonphimon Wongthida, Ph.D.; and Rosa Maria Diaz, Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic; Fiona Errington, Ph.D.; John Chester, Ph.D.; Peter Selby, Ph.D.; and Alan Melcher, Ph.D., all of the Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre, St. James' University Hospital and Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, UK; Heung Chong, Ph.D., of St George's Hospital Medical School, London; Hardev Pandha, Ph.D., of the University of Surrey, Guildford, UK; and Kevin Harrington, Ph.D., of the Institute for Cancer Research, London.

The National Institutes of Health, Cancer Research UK, The Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation, Mayo Clinic, and a private grant funded the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Timothy Kottke, Fiona Errington, Jose Pulido, Feorillo Galivo, Jill Thompson, Phonphimon Wongthida, Rosa Maria Diaz, Heung Chong, Elizabeth Ilett, John Chester, Hardev Pandha, Kevin Harrington, Peter Selby, Alan Melcher, Richard Vile. Broad antigenic coverage induced by vaccination with virus-based cDNA libraries cures established tumors. Nature Medicine, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/nm.2390

Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Human vaccine used to cure prostate cancer in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110619133456.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2011, June 20). Human vaccine used to cure prostate cancer in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110619133456.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Human vaccine used to cure prostate cancer in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110619133456.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins