Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sepsis: Leaking blood vessels may be cause of infection-spreading condition, researchers suggest

Date:
June 24, 2011
Source:
St. Michael's Hospital
Summary:
Researchers have put forward a new theory as to what causes sepsis, an often fatal condition that occurs when infection spreads throughout the body. Leaking blood vessels may actually be a cause of sepsis, rather than a symptom as previously thought.

Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have put forward a new theory as to what causes sepsis, an often fatal condition that occurs when infection spreads throughout the body.

Related Articles


Leaking blood vessels may actually be a cause of sepsis, rather than a symptom as previously thought, said Dr. Warren Lee.

Dr. Lee's hypothesis and a review of recent research on sepsis were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Sepsis kills about 1,400 people a day worldwide and is the second-leading cause of death in intensive care units in Canada. Despite intense research, the death rate remains high, between 30 and 50 per cent. Treatments largely consist of surgical removal or drainage of the infected site, antibiotics and supportive care.

"The lack of therapies is not for want of effort. On the basis of promising in vitro and animal studies, many drugs have entered clinical trials only to fail, resulting in the description of sepsis research as a 'graveyard' of discovery," said Dr. Lee, a critical care physician and researcher in the hospital's L Ka Shing Knowledge Institute.

"The repeated failure of clinical trials suggests that some fundamental knowledge is lacking in our current understanding of the pathogenesis of human sepsis."

Dr. Lee said one reason previous trials may have failed is that they haven't taken into account a key feature of sepsis in humans -- diffuse microvascular leakage (widespread leakage from small blood vessels) leading to swelling in tissues and organs (edema). This causes organs throughout the body to malfunction. There have been no clinical trials of drugs designed to prevent or treat leaky blood vessels.

"This is a major change in our thinking about sepsis that could lead to novel treatments to save lives," Dr. Lee said. "Sepsis is a devastating illness. If we could develop drugs to stop blood vessels from leaking, we could save lives."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael's Hospital. The original article was written by Leslie Shepherd. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. N. M. Goldenberg, B. E. Steinberg, A. S. Slutsky, W. L. Lee. Broken Barriers: A New Take on Sepsis Pathogenesis. Science Translational Medicine, 2011; 3 (88): 88ps25 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002011

Cite This Page:

St. Michael's Hospital. "Sepsis: Leaking blood vessels may be cause of infection-spreading condition, researchers suggest." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623130944.htm>.
St. Michael's Hospital. (2011, June 24). Sepsis: Leaking blood vessels may be cause of infection-spreading condition, researchers suggest. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623130944.htm
St. Michael's Hospital. "Sepsis: Leaking blood vessels may be cause of infection-spreading condition, researchers suggest." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623130944.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) A rehabilitation robot prototype to help restore deteriorated nerves and muscles using electromyography and computer games. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins