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Compound may provide drug therapy approach for Huntington's disease

Date:
June 24, 2011
Source:
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have identified compounds that appear to inhibit a signaling pathway in Huntington's disease, a finding that may eventually lead to a potential drug therapy to help slow the progression of degenerative nerve disorders.

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified compounds that appear to inhibit a signaling pathway in Huntington's disease, a finding that may eventually lead to a potential drug therapy to help slow the progression of degenerative nerve disorders.

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"Our studies have uncovered a new therapeutic target for Huntington's disease treatment and possibly for other neurodegenerative diseases," said Dr. Ilya Bezprozvanny, professor of physiology and senior author of the study, published in the June 23 issue of Chemistry and Biology. "In addition, we now have this new series of compounds that gives us a tool to study the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease."

Huntington's disease is a fatal genetic disorder in which certain brain cells waste away. More than 250,000 people in the U.S. have the disorder or are at risk for it. The most common form is adult-onset, with symptoms usually developing in patients in their mid-30s and 40s.

The disease results in uncontrolled movements, psychiatric disturbance, gradual dementia and eventually death. There is no therapy available currently to slow the progression of the disease.

Scientists at UT Southwestern found that quinazoline-derived compounds effectively block what is known as the store-operated calcium entry signaling pathway, which was never before implicated in Huntington nerve cells but that might be a therapeutic target in the disease.

Dr. Bezprozvanny's laboratory research has contributed to growing scientific evidence that suggests abnormalities in neuronal calcium signaling play an important role in the development of Huntington's disease. UT Southwestern researchers demonstrated in the current study that the quinoline compounds -- supplied by EnVivo -- protected brain cells.

"If this holds, this compound can be considered to have potential therapeutic application for Huntington's," he said. "As we ultimately seek a cure, we are encouraged to have found something that may slow the progress or delay the onset of the disease."

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved were Jun Wu, research scientist in physiology and lead author, and physiology research associates Xuesong Chen and Dr. Qingqing Wu. Researchers from EnVivo and the Institute of Cytology Russian Academy of Sciences, in St. Petersburg, also participated in the study.

The study, which used cultured mouse nerves, was funded by EnVivo, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, CHDI Foundation and the Russian Basic Research Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jun Wu, Hsin-Pei Shih, Vladimir Vigont, Lori Hrdlicka, Len Diggins, Carol Singh, Matt Mahoney, Richard Chesworth, Gideon Shapiro, Olga Zimina et al. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry Pathway as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Huntington's Disease Treatment. Chemistry & Biology, Volume 18, Issue 6, 777-793, 24 June 2011 DOI: 10.1016/j.chembiol.2011.04.012

Cite This Page:

UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Compound may provide drug therapy approach for Huntington's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623151227.htm>.
UT Southwestern Medical Center. (2011, June 24). Compound may provide drug therapy approach for Huntington's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623151227.htm
UT Southwestern Medical Center. "Compound may provide drug therapy approach for Huntington's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110623151227.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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