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Rush hour in a coffee stain: Transition from order to disorder

Date:
September 4, 2011
Source:
University of Twente
Summary:
A remarkable effect never witnessed before has been discovered in the ring-shaped stains of tiny dissolved particles ('coffee stains') that develop after a liquid has evaporated. While the particles on the outside of the ring are neatly organized, chaos reigns on the inside of the ring where the particles seem to have collected in a great hurry.

'Coffee stain' with ordering at the edge and disorder further within.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Twente

A remarkable effect never witnessed before has been discovered in the ring-shaped stains of tiny dissolved particles ('coffee stains') that develop after a liquid has evaporated. While the particles on the outside of the ring are neatly organized, chaos reigns on the inside of the ring where the particles seem to have collected in a great hurry.

Researchers from the Physics of Fluids department at the University of Twente explain this phenomenon in Physical Review Letters.

The familiar dark ring that remains after a drop of coffee has evaporated develops because the particles in the liquid move towards the outer edge of the drop as the liquid evaporates. This 'coffee stain effect' is also seen in other solutions in which particles are dispersed, so-called colloidal solutions or suspensions. While studying the speed at which the particles move in the solution, UT researchers discovered that there is more to this process than gradual evaporation and liquid transport.

Tetris

Initially, things proceed very much as one would expect: the drop gradually evaporates. As the liquid evaporates, the balance in the remaining liquid is restored and the particles flow towards the outer edge of ring; the contact line of the drop. At this stage, the particles move very slowly and take time to organize themselves around the circle enclosing the drop. But as the liquid evaporates and reduces, the drop becomes 'flatter'. The same amount of liquid must now move through a surface that is shrinking, causing the speed of the liquid to rapidly accelerate. At a critical moment, it is rush hour as all the particles try to reach the outside of the ring in record speed. Instead of a neat crystal structure, the result is a chaotic mountain of particles: it resembles the end of the time limit in a game of Tetris.

As time runs out, the same amount of liquid must move through a surface that is rapidly shrinking. The particles no longer have time to organize themselves into a crystal structure according to the so-called Brownian Motion, and are instead forced towards the outside. The researchers show that the moment at which order transits into disorder can be accurately calculated. This is important when evaporation causes new crystal structures to be formed from colloidal solutions, for example.

The research was carried out in the Physics of Fluids department of Professor Detlef Lohse. The department is part of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente.

A video illustrating the effect can be found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bnku2078kG0


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Twente. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Αlvaro Marνn, Hanneke Gelderblom, Detlef Lohse, Jacco Snoeijer. Order-to-Disorder Transition in Ring-Shaped Colloidal Stains. Physical Review Letters, 2011; 107 (8) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.085502

Cite This Page:

University of Twente. "Rush hour in a coffee stain: Transition from order to disorder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829113450.htm>.
University of Twente. (2011, September 4). Rush hour in a coffee stain: Transition from order to disorder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829113450.htm
University of Twente. "Rush hour in a coffee stain: Transition from order to disorder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829113450.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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