Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Possible key to preventing chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer found

Date:
September 15, 2011
Source:
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
Summary:
Researchers have identified a molecular pathway that may play a key role in the evolution of chemotherapy resistance. They are hopeful that the discovery may lead to therapies that are tailored to individual patients with ovarian cancer; reversing resistance to chemotherapy and improving survival from the disease.

For patients with ovarian cancer and their physicians, resistance to chemotherapy is a serious concern. However, researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have identified a molecular pathway that may play a key role in the evolution of chemotherapy resistance. They are hopeful that the discovery may lead to therapies that are tailored to individual patients with ovarian cancer; reversing resistance to chemotherapy and improving survival from the disease.

Related Articles


"Few clinical or biologic events affect survival for patients with ovarian cancer more than the way their tumors respond to chemotherapy," said Johnathan Lancaster, M.D., Ph.D., senior author on a study into chemotherapy resistance recently published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. "We identified a pathway called the 'BCL2 antagonist of cell death,' or BAD, and determined that the activity of the BAD pathway may have more influence on survival than the volume of residual disease after primary surgery."

According to Lancaster and colleagues, the discovery of BAD opens the door to using the pathway as a biomarker to identify patients with the highest-risk ovarian cancer, which are genetically programmed to be resistant to chemotherapy; enabling physicians to identify patients who might benefit from drugs that inhibit the BAD pathway such that chemo-resistance is reversed.

"Targeted therapies that increase a tumor's sensitivity to chemotherapy offer the potential to improve patient survival," explained Lancaster, chair of the Department of Women's Oncology and director of the Center for Women's Oncology at Moffitt.

By treating ovarian cancer cells in a test tube (in vitro) with a chemotherapy drug and observing which genetic pathways became most active, the researchers identified the BAD pathway. To further analyze the activity of the BAD pathway and levels of the BAD protein, the researchers examined tumor specimens and genomic information from almost 300 patients with advanced ovarian cancer. A 47-gene BAD pathway signature was developed and was found to be associated with survival. Subsequent in vitro tests on ovarian cancer cells suggest that it may be possible to inhibit the BAD pathway and reverse resistance to chemotherapy.

"Intriguingly, patients who had lots of cancer remaining at the conclusion of their surgery but whose tumors had low levels of pBAD protein, had better survival than patients with very little cancer remaining following surgery, but who had high levels of pBAD protein," said Lancaster. "Although our data highlights the importance of this newly identified pathway, not all cell line samples showed associations between chemotherapy resistance and BAD pathway genes. There are likely many other pathways and processes contributing to chemotherapy resistance."

The researchers concluded that although more research is necessary, BAD pathway-based biomarkers could open the door to personalized treatment for ovarian cancer by placing women in high-risk and low-risk groups based on their genetic profile for the BAD pathway and protein. Treatments could be selected for each patient according to the status of their BAD pathway.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. C. Marchion, H. M. Cottrill, Y. Xiong, N. Chen, E. Bicaku, W. J. Fulp, N. Bansal, H. S. Chon, X. B. Stickles, S. G. Kamath, A. Hakam, L. Li, D. Su, C. Moreno, P. L. Judson, A. Berchuck, R. M. Wenham, S. M. Apte, J. Gonzalez Bosquet, G. Bloom, S. A. Eschrich, S. M. Sebti, D.-T. Chen, J. M. Lancaster. BAD phosphorylation determines ovarian cancer chemo-sensitivity and patient survival. Clinical Cancer Research, 2011; DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-0735

Cite This Page:

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "Possible key to preventing chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer found." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110915131645.htm>.
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. (2011, September 15). Possible key to preventing chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer found. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110915131645.htm
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "Possible key to preventing chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer found." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110915131645.htm (accessed March 4, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Adults Only Get The Flu Twice A Decade, Researchers Say

Adults Only Get The Flu Twice A Decade, Researchers Say

Newsy (Mar. 4, 2015) Researchers found adults only get the flu about once every five years. Scientists analyzed how a person&apos;s immunity builds up over time as well. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mount Everest Has a Poop Problem

Mount Everest Has a Poop Problem

Buzz60 (Mar. 4, 2015) With no bathrooms to use, climbers of Mount Everest have been leaving human waste on the mountain for years, and it&apos;s becoming a health issue. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to 'Skinny' Your Home

The Best Tips to 'Skinny' Your Home

Buzz60 (Mar. 4, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to reach your health goals this season, there are a few simple tips to help you spring clean your space and improve your nutrition. Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has the skinny on keeping a healthy home. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Analysis: Supreme Court Hears ACA Challenge

Analysis: Supreme Court Hears ACA Challenge

AP (Mar. 4, 2015) Associated Press legal reporter Mark Sherman breaks down the details of the latest Affordable Care Act challenge to make it to the Supreme Court. (March 4) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins