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Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED

Date:
September 30, 2011
Source:
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
Summary:
Researchers in South Korea have developed a new concept in cancer detection: a biocompatible, flexible gallium nitride (GaN) LED that can detect prostate cancer.

The team of professor Keon Jae Lee (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST) has developed a new concept: a biocompatible, flexible gallium nitride (GaN) LED that can detect prostate cancer.
Credit: KAIST PR Office

Can a flexible LED placed on the human heart, brain, or blood vessels diagnose or even treat various diseases? New research suggests these possibilities may soon become a reality.

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A team of researchers in South Korea led by Prof. Keon Jae Lee (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST) has developed a new concept in cancer detection: a biocompatible, flexible gallium nitride (GaN) LED that can detect prostate cancer.

GaN LED, a highly efficient light emitting device, has been commercialized in LED TVs and in the lighting industry. Until now, it has been difficult to use this semiconductor material to fabricate flexible electronic systems due to its brittleness. The research team, however, has succeeded in developing a highly efficient, flexible GaN LED and in detecting cancer using a flexible LED biosensor.

Prof. Lee was involved in the first co-invention of "High Performance Flexible Single Crystal GaN" during his PhD course at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). This flexible GaN LED biosensor utilized a similar protocol to transfer thin GaN LED films onto flexible substrates, followed by a biocompatible packaging process; the system's overall potential for use in implantable biomedical applications was demonstrated.

Prof. John Roger (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UIUC) said, "Bio-integrated LEDs represent an exciting, new technology with strong potential to address important challenges in human health. This present work represents a very nice contribution to this emerging field."

The paper was published online Sept. 16, 2011 in Elsevier's journal Nano Energy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sang Yong Lee, Kwi-Il Park, Chul Huh, Min Koo, Hyeon Gyun Yoo, Seungjun Kim, Chil Seong Ah, Gun Yong Sung, Keon Jae Lee. Water-resistant flexible GaN LED on a liquid crystal polymer substrate for implantable biomedical applications. Nano Energy, 2011; DOI: 10.1016/j.nanoen.2011.07.001

Cite This Page:

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). "Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110919093849.htm>.
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). (2011, September 30). Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110919093849.htm
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). "Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110919093849.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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