Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Abiraterone acetate improves fatigue in prostate cancer patients, finds international clinical trial

Date:
September 25, 2011
Source:
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation
Summary:
Men with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and that is resistant to hormone therapy suffer less from fatigue if they are treated with a combination of abiraterone acetate and prednisone, according to a new study. Significant improvements in fatigue are important for this group of difficult-to-treat patients who had few available therapeutic options, and for whom fatigue is one of the most distressing issues they face.

Men with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and that is resistant to hormone therapy suffer less from fatigue if they are treated with a combination of abiraterone acetate and prednisone, according to results from a phase III clinical trial presented today.

Dr Cora Sternberg told the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, in Stockholm today (Monday 26 September), that the significant improvements in fatigue were important for this group of difficult-to-treat patients who had few available therapeutic options.

"Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is cancer that has spread from the prostate and that develops resistance to therapies targeting the male sex hormones such as androgen that drive the cancer's growth. It is a chronic, progressive disease and, until now, men have few treatment options and poor prognosis. If treatment with androgen deprivation and docetaxel chemotherapy fails, then the average survival is only around 18-19 months," said Dr Sternberg, head of the Department of Medical Oncology at the San Camillo and Forlanini Hospitals in Rome, Italy.

"One of the most distressing issues these metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients face during hormone treatment is extreme fatigue. Our results show that abiraterone acetate therapy has the potential to reduce cancer-related fatigue in this patient population, in addition to the previously demonstrated survival benefit," she said.

Abiraterone acetate (ZYTIGA™) is a new oral drug that specifically blocks the production of the male sex hormones (androgens) by the prostate tumour itself, as well as the testes and adrenal glands, all androgen sources which can fuel prostate cancer progression.

Dr Sternberg and her colleagues carried out a retrospective analysis assessing the effect of abiraterone acetate therapy on patient-reported fatigue using data from the COU-AA-301 international Phase III study. The study randomised 1195 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who had previously received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel, to receive the steroid prednisone with either abiraterone acetate (797 patients) or placebo (398 patients). Patient-reported fatigue was measured using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) questionnaire at various times during the study.

"We conducted a series of analyses to assess different aspects of the impact of abiraterone acetate on both fatigue intensity and interference with general activity, mood, walking, work, relationships and enjoyment of life," she said. "We also employed different analytical approaches to test our hypotheses. The results are clinically meaningful and remain robust after adjusting for non-random missing data."

The data indicated that patients who received abiraterone acetate had significantly better patient-reported outcomes for fatigue than the placebo group over the study duration. Indeed, the progression of fatigue intensity and interference with general activity, mood, walking, work, relationships and enjoyment of life was significantly delayed in patients who received abiraterone acetate.

At a later stage, Dr Sternberg and her colleagues are planning to explore potential associations between the improvements in patient-reported fatigue and other clinical variables such as overall survival and disease progression.

Dr Sternberg added: "The future looks brighter for men with this disease and with several new therapies recently approved for advanced prostate cancer, we have more hope for our patients, because they are not only living longer, they are also living better. I think this is a huge step forward in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer."

Cancer of the prostate is the second most commonly reported cancer in men, with more than 890,000 cases diagnosed worldwide every year. It usually occurs in older patients, and globally more than 250,000 men died from the disease in 2008.

"It is very important that research into new anti-cancer strategies not only evaluates its impact on prevention of tumour progression and improvement of survival time, but also evaluates in detail whether and how the treatment affects quality of life and the activity of patients," said Professor Michael Baumann, President of ECCO. "Severe fatigue is a very distressing side effect of some therapies against prostate cancer and research into therapeutic options leading to less fatigue is of great value for patients and their families."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation. "Abiraterone acetate improves fatigue in prostate cancer patients, finds international clinical trial." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110925125159.htm>.
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation. (2011, September 25). Abiraterone acetate improves fatigue in prostate cancer patients, finds international clinical trial. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110925125159.htm
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation. "Abiraterone acetate improves fatigue in prostate cancer patients, finds international clinical trial." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110925125159.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins