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What can magnetic resonance tractography teach us about human brain anatomy?

Date:
September 26, 2011
Source:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Summary:
Magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) is a valuable, noninvasive imaging tool for studying human brain anatomy and, as MRT methods and technologies advance, has the potential to yield new and illuminating information on brain activity and connectivity.

Magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) is a valuable, noninvasive imaging tool for studying human brain anatomy and, as MRT methods and technologies advance, has the potential to yield new and illuminating information on brain activity and connectivity. Critical information about the promise and limitations of this technology is explored in a forward-looking review article in the new neuroscience journal Brain Connectivity.

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Diffusion tractography allows scientists to visualize and determine the location of white matter in the brain. If current technological challenges associated with MRT are recognized and overcome, such as limitations in its accuracy and quantification, this imaging technique could make a significant contribution to the field of brain connectivity and to an understanding of how information and signals are transmitted across the brain, according to Saad Jbabdi and Heidi Johansen-Berg, University of Oxford, U.K., in the review article entitled, "Tractography: Where Do We Go from Here?"

"This emerging technology offers a new window into human brain anatomy. The technique has enormous potential for revealing the architecture of the human brain and its breakdown in disease. Recent developments mean that some of the limitations and challenges associated with this technique could be effectively tackled in the near future" says Heidi Johansen-Berg, PhD, co-author and Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow at the University of Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Saad Jbabdi and Heidi Johansen-Berg. Tractography: Where Do We Go from Here? Brain Connectivity, Volume 1, Number 3, 2011 DOI: 10.1089/brain.2011.0033

Cite This Page:

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.. "What can magnetic resonance tractography teach us about human brain anatomy?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926132024.htm>.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.. (2011, September 26). What can magnetic resonance tractography teach us about human brain anatomy?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926132024.htm
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.. "What can magnetic resonance tractography teach us about human brain anatomy?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110926132024.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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