Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Large meta-analysis finds new genes for type 1 diabetes

Date:
September 30, 2011
Source:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Summary:
The largest-ever analysis of genetic data related to type 1 diabetes has uncovered new genes associated with the common metabolic disease, which affects 200 million people worldwide. The findings add to knowledge of gene networks involved in the origin of this complex disorder, in which patients depend on frequent insulin injections to control their blood sugar levels.

The largest-ever analysis of genetic data related to type 1 diabetes has uncovered new genes associated with the common metabolic disease, which affects 200 million people worldwide. The findings add to knowledge of gene networks involved in the origin of this complex disorder, in which patients depend on frequent insulin injections to control their blood sugar levels.

Related Articles


"Genome-wide association studies, as we used here, have been extremely powerful in identifying gene locations involved in the pathogenesis of complex, common diseases," said study leader Hakon Hakonarson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Applied Genomics at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "The larger the cohort used, the more discoveries we can make, and the more we find intriguing biological pathways offering insight into causes of disease."

The study appears online September 29 in Public Library of Science Genetics (PLoS Genetics).

The genome-wide association study (GWAS), in which Hakonarson collaborated with Constantine Polychronakos, M.D., director of Pediatric Endocrinology at McGill University, was a meta-analysis, investigating combined DNA data from six large publicly available datasets of type 1 diabetes. The six studies included data from approximately 10,000 individuals with the disease and 17,000 control subjects. The databases contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) -- single-base changes in DNA sequence that serve as signposts for gene mutations associated with them.

SNPs are not disease-causing mutations, but they reside in gene regions associated with the disease, and set the stage for more detailed sequencing studies to pinpoint causative mutations. Previous studies by Hakonarson and colleagues over the past four years had already discovered SNPs related to type 1 diabetes.

In addition to validating results from previous studies, the current research identified, then replicated, three novel SNPs located in regions of considerable biological interest, being involved in protein-protein interactions, inflammation and cell signaling activity. "Our study found SNPs that we had not expected to have any connection to type 1 diabetes," said Hakonarson. "The strongest association among the three SNPs was in the region of the LMO7 gene on chromosome 13. We previously associated another member of the LMO gene family with the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. This gene family plays an important role in protein-protein interactions, but it would not have occurred to anyone that it may be active in type 1 diabetes. GWAS continues to turn up surprising biological associations."

Hakonarson added that follow-up studies will focus on resequencing the regions linked to the SNPs to narrow down causative mutations. Further research will concentrate on investigating how specific mutations function in the development of type 1 diabetes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hakon Hakonarson et al. A genome-wide meta-analysis of six type 1 diabetes cohorts identifies multiple associated loci. PLoS Genetics, 2011 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002293

Cite This Page:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Large meta-analysis finds new genes for type 1 diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929171700.htm>.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. (2011, September 30). Large meta-analysis finds new genes for type 1 diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929171700.htm
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Large meta-analysis finds new genes for type 1 diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929171700.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins