Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

X-ray camera makes A-grade particle detector

Date:
October 11, 2011
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Combining an off-the-shelf X-ray camera with a thin piece of carbon foil yields a device that can detect high-energy organic atoms and heavy molecules better than the typical devices used for these jobs, with potential benefits ranging from the science of cancer treatment to star chemistry.

In the particle identification business, two pieces of information are vital: energy and spatial location. By measuring its energy you can work out the mass of your mystery particle. From its spatial location on the surface of a detector, you can work out where the particle came from -- and therefore how big the event was that produced the particle in the first place.

For the range of energies close to one million electron volts (1 MeV) -- a popular energy range to probe, with uses in a variety of fields from cancer treatment research to astrochemistry -- there are currently two leading methods of detecting particles. But both are limited in the types of molecules they can detect, and both sacrifice one type of information -- spatial location or energy measurements -- for the other.

Now a group of nuclear physicists and molecular scientists from the Universitι Paris Sud and Hamamatsu Photonics have demonstrated a new type of detector that can do both of these jobs at the same time. Their device uses the CCD image sensor chip in a particular off-the-shelf X-ray camera. In the study, described in a paper accepted to the AIP's Review of Scientific Instruments, the experimenters accelerated charged atoms (or ions) of carbon at various energies above 1 MeV, then "caught" those atoms with the camera. A single ion impact with the camera produced a bright spot on the image sensor.

They also accelerated molecules containing carbon and hydrogen. Unfortunately, these bigger particles overwhelmed the CCD chip, wiping out the details.

To avoid saturating the sensor, the researchers came up with the solution of putting a piece of thin carbon foil in front of it. The foil breaks up the projectile molecules that collide with it and sends them, like shrapnel, to the sensor to be counted. The foil also allowed them to separate different types of molecules from one another when the molecules' signatures would otherwise have overlapped.

The researchers say they hope their new detector will open the door to a new class of tools in the study of complex molecules using high-energy accelerators.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Chabot, G. Martinet, K. Béroff, T. Pino, S. Bouneau, B. Genolini, X. Grave, K. Nguyen, C. le Gailliard, P. Rosier, G. Féraud, H. Friha, B. Villier. Detection of atomic and molecular mega-electron-volt projectiles using an x-ray charged coupled device camera. Review of Scientific Instruments, 2011; 82 (10): 103301 DOI: 10.1063/1.3640411

Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "X-ray camera makes A-grade particle detector." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111011121258.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2011, October 11). X-ray camera makes A-grade particle detector. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111011121258.htm
American Institute of Physics. "X-ray camera makes A-grade particle detector." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111011121258.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Robotic Eyes' Helps Japan's Bipedal Bot Run Faster

'Robotic Eyes' Helps Japan's Bipedal Bot Run Faster

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 16, 2014) — Japanese researcher uses an eye-sensor camera to enable a bipedal robot to balance itself, while running on a treadmill. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lockheed Martin's Fusion Concept Basically An Advertisement

Lockheed Martin's Fusion Concept Basically An Advertisement

Newsy (Oct. 15, 2014) — Lockheed Martin announced plans to develop the first-ever compact nuclear fusion reactor. But some experts said the excitement is a little premature. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

First Confirmed Case Of Google Glass Addiction

Buzz60 (Oct. 15, 2014) — A Google Glass user was treated for Internet Addiction Disorder caused from overuse of the device. Morgan Manousos (@MorganManousos) has the details on how many hours he spent wearing the glasses, and what his symptoms were. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Science Proves Why Pizza Is So Delicious

Science Proves Why Pizza Is So Delicious

Buzz60 (Oct. 15, 2014) — The American Chemical Society’s latest video about chemistry in every day life breaks down pizza, and explains exactly why it's so delicious. Gillian Pensavalle (@GillianWithaG) has the video. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins