Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Better pictures with mobile devices

Date:
October 14, 2011
Source:
SINTEF
Summary:
The world's smallest autofocus lens for mobile devices is ready, and Apple and Nokia are among the companies interested in introducing it.

Dag Wang and his colleagues at SINTEF have created an autofocus lens which mimics the human eye.
Credit: Geir Mogen

The world's smallest autofocus lens for mobile devices is ready, and Apple and Nokia are among the companies interested in introducing it.

Related Articles


Six years ago a group of SINTEF research scientists at MiNaLab in Oslo began throwing around ideas for new energy-saving features which would provide autofocus in small optical systems.

Most mobile telephones today have built-in cameras, but these are not equipped with autofocus like ordinary photographic cameras. The small aperture results in a acceptable depth of focus, but also admits limited amounts of light, making indoor photography difficult and the photos are often not sharp.

An important requirement for the researchers was the ability to focus the lens sharply. This is normally achieved by moving lenses, but this requires energy, and the optimal solution would therefore be to change the curvature of the lens itself, just like the lens of the human eye.

Like the human eye

What the researchers needed was therefore some sort of soft and variable lens and a material which could mimic the muscles of the eye which control the lens.

"The idea of creating an autofocus lens using the principles found in nature got us thinking at the time," research scientist Dag Vang recalls. "The result was a sketch of an optical "sandwich" consisting of extremely thin glass plates, a polymer, a gel material and a metal alloy with flexible properties -- all at very small scale."

The required material was developed to order. To succeed, the researchers needed to make a ring of material contract and expand almost without expending energy -- and at the same time construct a gel-based lens in the middle.

After a year of intense development work the research team had a working prototype, and in 2006 they signed a project contract with the Norwegian company PoLight in Horten. This small company had been working on optical systems for some time and saw the potential for introducing the technology to the mobile phone market.

Earlier this year the company demonstrated the new camera lens, integrated into a mobile phone camera, to interested specialists at the world's largest mobile device exhibition, Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. "There was great interest because of the picture quality provided by the lens. We are now in discussions with several of the major mobile phone manufacturers and subcontractors, and I hope we will have a contract by the end of this year," says Jon Ulvenson, Managing Director of PoLight.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SINTEF. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

SINTEF. "Better pictures with mobile devices." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012083446.htm>.
SINTEF. (2011, October 14). Better pictures with mobile devices. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012083446.htm
SINTEF. "Better pictures with mobile devices." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012083446.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Building Google Into Cars

Building Google Into Cars

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Google's next Android version could become the standard that'll power your vehicle's entertainment and navigation features, Reuters has learned. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP Review: Nikon D750 and GoPro Hero 4

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) What to buy an experienced photographer or video shooter? There is some strong gear on the market from Nikon and GoPro. The AP's Ron Harris takes a closer look. (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: Better Ways to Create Jobs Than Keystone Pipeline

Obama: Better Ways to Create Jobs Than Keystone Pipeline

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) US President Barack Obama says that construction of the Keystone pipeline would have 'very little impact' on US gas prices and believes there are 'more direct ways' to create construction jobs. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins