Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cause of rare immune disease identified: Genetic mutation leads to cold allergy, immune deficiency and autoimmunity

Date:
January 11, 2012
Source:
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Summary:
Investigators have identified a genetic mutation in three unrelated families that causes a rare immune disorder characterized by excessive and impaired immune function. Symptoms of this condition include immune deficiency, autoimmunity, inflammatory skin disorders and cold-induced hives, a condition known as cold urticaria.

(Left) Patient's forearm before a cold challenge test. Letter A represents area of the arm where drop of water was placed. (Right) Patient's forearm after the test. Blue arrows point to red hives that have formed after the water is placed on the arm and cold air is blown across it.
Credit: NIAID

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation in three unrelated families that causes a rare immune disorder characterized by excessive and impaired immune function. Symptoms of this condition include immune deficiency, autoimmunity, inflammatory skin disorders and cold-induced hives, a condition known as cold urticaria.

The study was led by Joshua Milner, M.D., in the Laboratory of Allergic Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and Daniel Kastner, M.D., Ph.D., scientific director at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). It appears in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine on Jan. 11, 2012.

The mutation discovered occurs in a gene for phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLCG2), an enzyme involved in the activation of immune cells. The investigators have named the condition PLCG2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation, or PLAID.

"Investigating rare diseases gives researchers more clues about how the healthy immune system functions," says NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "More importantly, identifying the genetic cause of these disorders opens up possibilities for better disease management and potentially a cure for people who may have spent their entire lives debilitated by severe and unexplained symptoms."

The NIH study involved 27 people from three separate families who all suffered from an inherited form of cold urticaria, an allergic disease characterized by the formation of itchy, sometimes painful hives, episodes of fainting and, in certain cases, life-threatening reactions in response to cold temperatures.

Blood sample analysis revealed that many patients produced antibodies to their own cells and tissues (autoantibodies), making them more susceptible to developing autoimmune disease. More than half had a history of recurrent infections, and laboratory tests revealed that most had low levels of infection-fighting antibodies and low numbers and reduced activity of circulating immune B cells -- all symptoms of immune deficiency disease. In three cases, patients had common variable immunodeficiency, a disease that requires frequent intravenous infusions of immune globulin to prevent severe infections. Seven patients suffered from granulomas, inflamed masses of tissue, which formed on their fingers, ears, nose and other parts of their skin.

"This is one of few examples in which the allergy symptom directed us to a genetic syndrome," says Dr. Milner. "In trying to understand the link between this group of conditions -- autoimmunity, chronic infections and cold urticaria -- we not only identified a disease-causing mutation but uncovered a unique and fascinating genetic mechanism at the crux of allergy, immune defense and self-tolerance."

"This study illustrates the power of multidisciplinary teamwork involving clinicians, geneticists and basic immunologists to get to the heart of seemingly insoluble medical mysteries," says Dr. Kastner. "Our team and colleagues working in the field now have much better odds of improving health outcomes for people with PLAID and for understanding this gene's role in other disorders."

The NIAID investigators teamed up with gene hunting experts in Dr. Kastner's laboratory and found the PLCG2 mutation after performing gene analysis and DNA sequencing studies. The mutation caused the PLCG2 enzyme to function without shutting off. Despite the fact that the enzyme was constantly turned on, immune cells ignored its signaling and did not activate normally.

Investigators performed a series of laboratory experiments to understand how the PLCG2 mutation affects B cells and mast cells, immune cells that contain histamine and other chemicals that are released during an allergic response. Patients' B cells containing the mutated gene fail to turn on normally, leading to their inability to produce antibody, but also an inability to sense when they are producing autoantibodies. Laboratory-developed mast cells containing the mutated gene released chemicals on exposure to cool temperatures, which could explain why the patients developed cold-induced hives.

According to the investigators, their findings suggest that inhibiting PLCG2 activity could be a therapeutic strategy to treat cold-induced hives, autoimmunity and immune deficiency in people with PLAID, but more studies are needed. The study findings also suggest that people previously diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency disease or with granulomatous diseases could have a PLCG2 gene mutation. Further study is needed to understand PLAID and how mutations in PLCG2 could contribute to other allergic and immunologic disorders.

"These findings are gratifying both for researchers and for people with this disorder," says NHGRI Director Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D. "Furthermore, this study illustrates how genome-analysis methods can empower efforts to unravel the molecular basis of rare genetic diseases."

Additional support for this work was provided by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, part of the NIH.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael J. Ombrello, Elaine F. Remmers, Guangping Sun, Alexandra F. Freeman, Shrimati Datta, Parizad Torabi-Parizi, Naeha Subramanian, Tom D. Bunney, Rhona W. Baxendale, Marta S. Martins, Neil Romberg, Hirsh Komarow, Ivona Aksentijevich, Hun Sik Kim, Jason Ho, Glenn Cruse, Mi-Yeon Jung, Alasdair M. Gilfillan, Dean D. Metcalfe, Celeste Nelson, Michelle O'Brien, Laura Wisch, Kelly Stone, Daniel C. Douek, Chhavi Gandhi, Alan A. Wanderer, Hane Lee, Stanley F. Nelson, Kevin V. Shianna, Elizabeth T. Cirulli, David B. Goldstein, Eric O. Long, Susan Moir, Eric Meffre, Steven M. Holland, Daniel L. Kastner, Matilda Katan, Hal M. Hoffman, Joshua D. Milner. Cold Urticaria, Immunodeficiency, and Autoimmunity Related toPLCG2Deletions. New England Journal of Medicine, 2012; 120111140019004 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1102140

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Cause of rare immune disease identified: Genetic mutation leads to cold allergy, immune deficiency and autoimmunity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120111223342.htm>.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2012, January 11). Cause of rare immune disease identified: Genetic mutation leads to cold allergy, immune deficiency and autoimmunity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120111223342.htm
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Cause of rare immune disease identified: Genetic mutation leads to cold allergy, immune deficiency and autoimmunity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120111223342.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins