Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Elevated glucose associated with undetected heart damage

Date:
February 2, 2012
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary:
A new study suggests that hyperglycemia injures the heart, even in patients without a history of heart disease or diabetes. The high-sensitivity test they used detected levels of cTnT tenfold lower than those found in patients diagnosed with a heart attack.

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) injures the heart, even in patients without a history of heart disease or diabetes. Researchers found that elevated levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for chronic hyperglycemia and diabetes, were associated with minute levels of the protein troponin T (cTnT), a blood marker for heart damage. The high-sensitivity test they used detected levels of cTnT tenfold lower than those found in patients diagnosed with a heart attack.

The findings, which are published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggest that hyperglycemia may be related to cardiac damage independent of atherosclerosis.

"Hyperglycemia and diabetes are known to be associated with an increased risk for heart attack and coronary disease and our study sheds some light on what may be happening," said Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH, senior author of the study and associate professor in the Bloomberg School's Department of Epidemiology. "Our results suggest that chronically elevated glucose levels may contribute to heart damage."

For the study, the researchers followed 9,662 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. None of the participants had coronary heart disease or history of heart failure. Higher levels of HbA1c were associated in a graded fashion with elevated levels of high-sensitivity cTnT. This relationship was present at HbA1c levels even below the threshold used to diagnose diabetes. Using conventional tests, troponin T can be detected in 0.7 percent of the population and is associated with heart attacks and death. With the high-sensitivity cTnT test, low levels of troponin were found in 66 percent of the study population.

"Our study hints at other potential pathways by which diabetes and elevated glucose are associated with heart disease. Mainly, glucose might not only be related to increased atherosclerosis, but potentially elevated glucose levels may directly damage cardiac muscle," said Jonathan Rubin, MD, general internal medicine fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He was lead author of the study while studying at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Additional authors of "Chronic Hyperglycemia and Subclinical Myocardial Injury" include Kunihiro Matsushita, MD, PhD, and Josef Coresh, MD, PhD, of the Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Christine M. Ballantyne, MD, and Ron Hoogeveen, PhD, of the Baylor College of Medicine.

The research was supported with grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jonathan Rubin, Kunihiro Matsushita, Christie M. Ballantyne, Ron Hoogeveen, Josef Coresh, Elizabeth Selvin. Chronic Hyperglycemia and Subclinical Myocardial Injury. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2012; 59 (5): 484 DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2011.10.875

Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Elevated glucose associated with undetected heart damage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120202151719.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2012, February 2). Elevated glucose associated with undetected heart damage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120202151719.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Elevated glucose associated with undetected heart damage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120202151719.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) Conjoined twins Emmett and Owen Ezell were separated by doctors in August. Now, nearly nine months later, they're being released from the hospital. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins