Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low levels of lipid antibodies increase complications following heart attack

Date:
February 6, 2012
Source:
Karolinska Institutet
Summary:
Coronary patients with low levels of an immune system antibody called anti-PC, which neutralizes parts of the "bad" cholesterol, run a greater risk of suffering complications following an acute cardiac episode and thus of premature death.

Coronary patients with low levels of an immune system antibody called anti-PC, which neutralises parts of the 'bad' cholesterol, run a greater risk of suffering complications following an acute cardiac episode and thus of premature death. This according to new research from Karolinska Institutet published in the scientific periodical The International Journal of Cardiology.

Related Articles


"We're hoping that injections of anti-PC can form part of the treatment received by coronary patients," says principal investigator Professor Johan Frostegård from the Institute of Environmental Medicine at Karolinska Institutet.

The main cause of myocardial infarction is atherosclerosis, in which plaque forms along the vascular walls and that has proved to be an inflammatory disease. The plaque contains large amounts of modified and oxidised bad cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL), which could also be described as a kind of rancid fat. There are also a great many dead cells. Problems arise when the body is unable to cleanse away these harmful plaque substances, and if the plaque then ruptures it can cause a stroke or heart attack.

Antibodies are formed to defend the body from what it treats as dangerous substances and foreign bodies. Apart from germs, this also includes dead cells. The team behind the present study have previously shown that there are natural antibodies (anti-PC) to the lipid phosphorylcholine (PC), which is found in, amongst other substances, LDL cholesterol and dead cells. Their hypothesis is that excessively low levels of anti-PC can be a contributor to atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

The present study in The International Journal of Cardiology shows that patients with low levels of anti-PC in connection with acute coronary syndromes and refractory, unstable angina run a greater risk of complications and premature death. The risk of death was more than double in coronary patients with low levels of anti-PC, who also had a significantly higher risk of additional heart attacks or other complications.

The study included 1,185 patients who had been admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg for acute coronary disease between September 1995 and March 2001. The blood samples on which the analyses were based were taken within 24 hours of their arrival.

According to Professor Frostegård, the results suggest that anti-PC can have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease by inhibiting inflammation and cell death. His team has spent many years developing immunological treatments for atherosclerotic plaque based on exploiting anti-PC to target phosphorylcholine. The work is done in part through a company set up within Karolinska Institutet's innovation system, and the model they have developed has been patented.

"The immunological treatment of cardiovascular diseases is clearly a Swedish speciality," says Professor Frostegård. "Other Swedish researchers maintain that it's apolipoprotein B, an important constituent of LDL, that we should be vaccinating against, but the two aren't mutually exclusive and a combination is conceivable and something that we're now also testing."

Professors Kenneth Caidahl and Ulf de Faire at Karolinska Institutet have also been involved in the study, along with researchers from the Sahlgren Academy. The project is part of the EU consortium CVDIMMUNE, which is being led by Professor Frostegård.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Karolinska Institutet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kenneth Caidahl, Marianne Hartford, Thomas Karlsson, Johan Herlitz, Knut Pettersson, Ulf de Faire, Johan Frostegård. IgM-phosphorylcholine autoantibodies and outcome in acute coronary syndromes. International Journal of Cardiology, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.01.018

Cite This Page:

Karolinska Institutet. "Low levels of lipid antibodies increase complications following heart attack." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120206102950.htm>.
Karolinska Institutet. (2012, February 6). Low levels of lipid antibodies increase complications following heart attack. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120206102950.htm
Karolinska Institutet. "Low levels of lipid antibodies increase complications following heart attack." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120206102950.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins