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Champagne gases different out of a flute versus coupe: Glass type affects gas release, likely influencing the drinking experience

Date:
February 8, 2012
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Champagne just isn't champagne without its bubbles, and a study highlights the effects that champagne glass shape and temperature can have on carbonation upon serving and the drinking experience.
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New research highlights the effects that champagne glass shape and temperature can have on carbonation upon serving and the drinking experience.
Credit: © Freefly / Fotolia

Champagne just isn't champagne without its bubbles, and a study highlights the effects that champagne glass shape and temperature can have on carbonation upon serving and the drinking experience.

The full report is published Feb. 8 in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

The researchers, led by Gerard Liger-Belair (GSMA), Guillaume Polidori (GRESPI) and Clara Cilindre (URVVC) of the University of Reims in France, studied the gaseous carbon dioxide and ethanol in the space above the champagne surface after it is poured into either a tall, narrow flute or a wide, shallow coupe. They found a much higher concentration of the gas above the flute than the coupe, which partly accounts for the very different drinking experiences from the two glasses. These results were also visualized by infrared thermography, which provided images of the gas escaping from the champagne surface. The authors also determined that, surprisingly, decreasing the champagne temperature did not affect the level of carbon dioxide gas above the flute.

These results "might be a precious resource to depict champagne consumer's sensation according to various tasting conditions," says Dr. Cilindre.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gérard Liger-Belair, Marielle Bourget, Hervé Pron, Guillaume Polidori, Clara Cilindre. Monitoring Gaseous CO2 and Ethanol above Champagne Glasses: Flute versus Coupe, and the Role of Temperature. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (2): e30628 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030628

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Champagne gases different out of a flute versus coupe: Glass type affects gas release, likely influencing the drinking experience." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208180247.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2012, February 8). Champagne gases different out of a flute versus coupe: Glass type affects gas release, likely influencing the drinking experience. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208180247.htm
Public Library of Science. "Champagne gases different out of a flute versus coupe: Glass type affects gas release, likely influencing the drinking experience." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208180247.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

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