Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Treating intestinal E. coli infection with antibiotic may reduce duration of bacterial carriage

Date:
March 13, 2012
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
In the E. coli outbreak in Germany in May 2011, treatment with azithromycin was associated with a lower frequency of long-term carriage of the bacteria and shorter duration of shedding of the bacteria in stool specimens, according to a new study.

In the E coli outbreak in Germany in May 2011, treatment with azithromycin was associated with a lower frequency of long-term carriage of the bacteria and shorter duration of shedding of the bacteria in stool specimens, according to a study in the March 14 issue of JAMA.

Related Articles


"Since May 2011, a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has caused 3,816 documented infections in Germany, including 845 confirmed cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome [HUS; a condition characterized by the breakup of red blood cells and kidney failure]," the authors write. "According to existing recommendations, antibiotic treatment of STEC infection is discouraged because this therapy might increase the risk of HUS development." The researchers add that long-term carriage can cause persistent diarrheal symptoms. "Moreover, long-term carriers of enteropathogenic [capable of causing disease in the intestinal tract] bacteria represent a chronic risk of human-to-human transmission and, therefore, their individual social and working life is legally restricted by the German health authorities, posing a high psychological and socioeconomic burden."

For this outbreak, data on long-term STEC carriage have not as yet been published. Martin Nitschke, M.D., of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck, Germany, and colleagues analyzed the duration of bacterial shedding in patients with this infection, comparing those who received azithromycin with those without antibiotic treatment. A substantial number of patients in this outbreak received prophylactic azithromycin treatment as part of a therapeutic regimen with the C5 antibody eculizumab. The study included 65 patients with STEC infection, including patients with HUS as well as STEC-infected outpatients without manifestation of HUS, between May 15 and July 26, 2011, and who were monitored for an average of 39.3 days after onset of clinical symptoms.

The initial azithromycin-treated group included 22 patients, and the control group included 43 patients without antibiotic treatment. On average, patients treated with azithromycin started therapy 11.8 days after the onset of clinical symptoms. There were no significant differences in the age or sex distributions between the groups.

The researchers found that the number of STEC carriers was significantly lower among patients treated with azithromycin. "At day 21, rates of STEC carriage were 31.8 percent in the initially treated group and 83.7 percent in those not treated. Long-term carriage (at day 28) was 4.5 percent in the treated group and 81.4 percent in the untreated group. At day 35, no patient in the treated group was a STEC carrier and all patients remained STEC-negative after the completion of 14 days of treatment. In contrast, 25 of 43 patients (57.7 percent) in the control group were STEC carriers at day 42 after onset of clinical symptoms."

Additionally, the observation of rapid clearance of STEC in stool specimens among azithromycin-treated patients and the high rate of long-term STEC carriage in the control group led to the decision to provide azithromycin treatment for 15 patients with remaining symptoms. After completion of treatment, all patients had at least 3 STEC-negative stool specimens. There were no signs of HUS induction due to azithromycin therapy.

"These findings warrant confirmation for other STEC strains, as well as prospective evaluation and possible clinical trials."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Nitschke, F. Sayk, C. Hartel, R. T. Roseland, S. Hauswaldt, J. Steinhoff, K. Fellermann, I. Derad, P. Wellhoner, J. Buning, B. Tiemer, A. Katalinic, J. Rupp, H. Lehnert, W. Solbach, J. K.- M. Knobloch. Association Between Azithromycin Therapy and Duration of Bacterial Shedding Among Patients With Shiga Toxin-Producing Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2012; 307 (10): 1046 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.264

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Treating intestinal E. coli infection with antibiotic may reduce duration of bacterial carriage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120313185907.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2012, March 13). Treating intestinal E. coli infection with antibiotic may reduce duration of bacterial carriage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120313185907.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Treating intestinal E. coli infection with antibiotic may reduce duration of bacterial carriage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120313185907.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Hottest Food Trends for 2015

The Hottest Food Trends for 2015

Buzz60 (Dec. 17, 2014) Urbanspoon predicts whicg food trends will dominate the culinary scene in 2015. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rover Finds More Clues About Possible Life On Mars

Rover Finds More Clues About Possible Life On Mars

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) NASA's Curiosity rover detected methane on Mars and organic compounds on the surface, but it doesn't quite prove there was life ... yet. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivory Trade Boom Swamps Law Efforts

Ivory Trade Boom Swamps Law Efforts

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 17, 2014) Demand for ivory has claimed the lives of tens of thousands of African elephants and now a conservation report says the illegal trade is overwhelming efforts to enforce the law. Amy Pollock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins