Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tracking proteins behaving badly provides insights for treatments of brain diseases

Date:
March 19, 2012
Source:
University of Melbourne
Summary:
Scientists have developed a novel technique that tracks diseased proteins behaving badly by forming clusters in brain diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's.

A research team led by the University of Melbourne has developed a novel technique that tracks diseased proteins behaving badly by forming clusters in brain diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's.

The technique recently published in Nature Methods is the first of its kind to rapidly identify and track the location of diseased proteins inside cells and could provide insights into improved treatments for brain diseases and others such as cancer.

Developed by Dr Danny Hatters and his team of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, the technique uses a flow cytometer to track the protein clusters in cells at a rate of 1000s per minute. In addition, cells with clustered proteins can be recovered for further study -- neither of which had been possible before.

"Being able to identify locations of diseased proteins in cells enables drugs to be developed to target different stages of disease development," he said.

He said the technique has application to many neurological diseases, which are characterised by formations of proteins clustering such as in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.

"A challenge for researchers has been trying to understand how proteins cluster and cause damage in diseases like Huntington's and Alzheimer's. This is the first approach which could enable us to answer those questions."

"Now we can see how the proteins form clusters inside a cell and can examine which cell functions are being damaged at different steps of the clustering process."

"No drugs at this stage can stop the clustering process in Huntington's disease for example. This sets up platforms to develop drugs that block the formation of clusters," Dr Hatters said.

The technique can also be used to examine how signaling processes occur such as when genes are switched on and off.

"It has application to track events of abnormal gene signaling such as in cancer " Dr Hatters said.

"This technique offers hope in improving treatments for a range of neurological and other conditions," he said.

This work builds on Dr Hatters previous research where he and his team identified the behaviour of diseased Huntington proteins forming into clusters.

The work was done in collaboration with Monash University.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Melbourne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yasmin M Ramdzan, Saskia Polling, Cheryl P Z Chia, Ivan H W Ng, Angelique R Ormsby, Nathan P Croft, Anthony W Purcell, Marie A Bogoyevitch, Dominic C H Ng, Paul A Gleeson, Danny M Hatters. Tracking protein aggregation and mislocalization in cells with flow cytometry. Nature Methods, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1930

Cite This Page:

University of Melbourne. "Tracking proteins behaving badly provides insights for treatments of brain diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 March 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120319095017.htm>.
University of Melbourne. (2012, March 19). Tracking proteins behaving badly provides insights for treatments of brain diseases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120319095017.htm
University of Melbourne. "Tracking proteins behaving badly provides insights for treatments of brain diseases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120319095017.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A recent report claims personality can change over time as we age, and usually that means becoming nicer and more emotionally stable. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

TheStreet (Apr. 22, 2014) In the U.S., there are more than 11 million couples trying to conceive at any given time. From helping celebrity moms like Bethanny Frankel to ordinary soon-to-be-moms, TV personality and parenting expert, Rosie Pope, gives you the inside scoop on mastering motherhood. London-born entrepreneur Pope is the creative force behind Rosie Pope Maternity and MomPrep. She explains why being an entrepreneur offers the best life balance for her and tips for all types of moms. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sorry, Guys, Only Women Can Make Their Voices Sound Sexier

Sorry, Guys, Only Women Can Make Their Voices Sound Sexier

Newsy (Apr. 21, 2014) According to researchers at Albright College, women have the ability to make their voices sound sexier, but men don't. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins