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Multiple faces of deadly breast cancer

Date:
April 4, 2012
Source:
Simon Fraser University
Summary:
Scientists have made a discovery that will change the way the most deadly form of breast cancer is treated. The study is the largest genetic analysis of what were thought to be triple negative breast cancer tumors.

An international team of scientists, including four at Simon Fraser University, has made a discovery that will change the way the most deadly form of breast cancer is treated.

The journal Nature has just published the team's findings online.

The study is the largest genetic analysis of what were thought to be triple negative breast cancer tumours.

The 59 scientists involved in this study expected to see similar gene profiles when they mapped on computer the genomes of 100 tumours.

But to their amazement they found no two genomes were similar, never mind the same. "Seeing these tumours at a molecular level has taught us we're dealing with a continuum of different types of breast cancer here, not just one," explains Steven Jones, co-author of this study.

The SFU molecular biology and biochemistry professor, who heads up bioinformatics research at the BC Cancer Agency, adds: "The genetic diversity of these tumours, even though they're clinically similar, probably explains why they are so difficult to treat. These findings prove the importance of personalizing cancer drug treatment so that it targets the genetic make up of a particular tumour rather than presuming one therapy can treat multiple, similar-looking tumours."

Triple negative breast cancer lacks surface cell receptors for estrogen, progesterone and herceptin -- a hormone, steroid and protein, respectively, linked to breast cancer. It strikes 16 per cent of women who develop breast cancer and targets mainly those under age 40.

Scientists consider it the most deadly form of breast cancer because it doesn't respond well to modern drug therapies, which knock out receptors found in most breast cancers but not this one.

Typically, triple negative breast cancer patients need everything thrown at them -- surgery, chemotherapy and radiation -- to have any hope of going into remission.

Jones credits the affordability of genetic sequencing -- a process that now takes tens of thousands rather than millions of dollars to do -- with making tumour analysis at the molecular level more readily available.

Other researchers associated with SFU involved in this research are Marco Marra, Martin Hirst and Gregg Morin. As well as being researchers at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, they are SFU adjunct professors of molecular biology and biochemistry.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Simon Fraser University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sohrab P. Shah, Andrew Roth, Rodrigo Goya, Arusha Oloumi, Gavin Ha, Yongjun Zhao, Gulisa Turashvili, Jiarui Ding, Kane Tse, Gholamreza Haffari, Ali Bashashati, Leah M. Prentice, Jaswinder Khattra, Angela Burleigh, Damian Yap, Virginie Bernard, Andrew McPherson, Karey Shumansky, Anamaria Crisan, Ryan Giuliany, Alireza Heravi-Moussavi, Jamie Rosner, Daniel Lai, Inanc Birol, Richard Varhol, Angela Tam, Noreen Dhalla, Thomas Zeng, Kevin Ma, Simon K. Chan, Malachi Griffith, Annie Moradian, S.-W. Grace Cheng, Gregg B. Morin, Peter Watson, Karen Gelmon, Stephen Chia, Suet-Feung Chin, Christina Curtis, Oscar M. Rueda, Paul D. Pharoah, Sambasivarao Damaraju, John Mackey, Kelly Hoon, Timothy Harkins, Vasisht Tadigotla, Mahvash Sigaroudinia, Philippe Gascard, Thea Tlsty, Joseph F. Costello, Irmtraud M. Meyer, Connie J. Eaves, Wyeth W. Wasserman, Steven Jones, David Huntsman, Martin Hirst, Carlos Caldas, Marco A. Marra, Samuel Aparicio. The clonal and mutational evolution spectrum of primary triple-negative breast cancers. Nature, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/nature10933

Cite This Page:

Simon Fraser University. "Multiple faces of deadly breast cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 April 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120404133755.htm>.
Simon Fraser University. (2012, April 4). Multiple faces of deadly breast cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120404133755.htm
Simon Fraser University. "Multiple faces of deadly breast cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120404133755.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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