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New process would make anti-malarial drug less costly

Date:
May 23, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting development of a new, higher-yield, two-step, less costly process that may ease supply problems and zigzagging prices for the raw material essential for making the mainstay drug for malaria. That disease sickens 300-500 million people annually and kills more than one million. The report on the process uses readily available substances and could be easily implemented by drug companies.

Scientists are reporting development of a new, higher-yield, two-step, less costly process that may ease supply problems and zigzagging prices for the raw material essential for making the mainstay drug for malaria. That disease sickens 300-500 million people annually and kills more than 1 million.

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The report on the process, which uses readily available substances and could be easily implemented by drug companies, appears in ACS' journal Organic Process Research & Development.

David Teager and Rodger Stringham of the Clinton Health Access Initiative explain that artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is the most effective treatment for malaria, a parasitic infection that is transferred to humans from the bite of an infected mosquito. Artemisinin, which is used to produce the key ingredient in ACT, comes from Artemisia annua, a medicinal plant grown in China. In recent years, the price for artemisinin has undergone huge market fluctuations, ranging from about $180 to $410 per pound, due to weather conditions and the demand for ACT. Keeping costs down is important because most cases of malaria occur in developing areas in the tropics and subtropics.

The researchers reasoned that one way to help stabilize prices would be to improve the current ACT manufacturing process, which consistently yields less of the ingredient than expected. That improvement would reduce the amount of Artemisia annua needed to make ACT.

The new process is much simpler and generates less potentially hazardous waste than the current method. It also reduced the amount of artemisinin required to make ACT, which makes the process less costly. A "semisynthetic" version of artemisinin also worked well as a starting material in the new method. "We are in the process of sharing this procedure with manufacturing partners in our global fight to combat malaria," say the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rodger W. Stringham, David S. Teager. Streamlined Process for the Conversion of Artemisinin to Artemether. Organic Process Research & Development, 2012; 16 (5): 764 DOI: 10.1021/op300037e

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New process would make anti-malarial drug less costly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 May 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120523115049.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, May 23). New process would make anti-malarial drug less costly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120523115049.htm
American Chemical Society. "New process would make anti-malarial drug less costly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120523115049.htm (accessed March 31, 2015).

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