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Quantum computers move closer to reality, thanks to highly enriched and highly purified silicon

Date:
June 7, 2012
Source:
Simon Fraser University
Summary:
Scientists have made the next step towards making quantum computing a reality -- through the unique properties of highly enriched and highly purified silicon.

SFU physicist Mike Thewalt and grad student Kamyar Saeedi with a sample of highly isotopically enriched silicon - its unique properties could advance quantum computing.
Credit: Image courtesy of Simon Fraser University

The quantum computer is a futuristic machine that could operate at speeds even more mind-boggling than the world's fastest super-computers.

Research involving physicist Mike Thewalt of Simon Fraser University offers a new step towards making quantum computing a reality, through the unique properties of highly enriched and highly purified silicon.

Quantum computers right now exist pretty much in physicists' concepts, and theoretical research. There are some basic quantum computers in existence, but nobody yet can build a truly practical one -- or really knows how.

Such computers will harness the powers of atoms and sub-atomic particles (ions, photons, electrons) to perform memory and processing tasks, thanks to strange sub-atomic properties.

What Thewalt and colleagues at Oxford University and in Germany have found is that their special silicon allows processes to take place and be observed in a solid state that scientists used to think required a near-perfect vacuum.

And, using this 28Si they have extended to three minutes -- from a matter of seconds -- the time in which scientists can manipulate, observe and measure the processes.

"It's by far a record in solid-state systems," Thewalt says. "If you'd asked people a few years ago if this was possible, they'd have said no. It opens new ways of using solid-state semi-conductors such as silicon as a base for quantum computing.

"You can start to do things that people thought you could only do in a vacuum. What we have found, and what wasn't anticipated, are the sharp spectral lines (optical qualities) in the 28Silicon we have been testing. It's so pure, and so perfect. There's no other material like it."

But the world is still a long way from practical quantum computers, he notes.

Quantum computing is a concept that challenges everything we know or understand about today's computers.

Your desktop or laptop computer processes "bits" of information. The bit is a fundamental unit of information, seen by your computer has having a value of either "1" or "0."

That last paragraph, when written in Word, contains 181 characters including spaces. In your home computer, that simple paragraph is processed as a string of some 1,448 "1"s and "0"s.

But in the quantum computer, the "quantum bit" (also known as a "qubit") can be both a "1" and a "0" -- and all values between 0 and 1 -- at the same time.

Says Thewalt: "A classical 1/0 bit can be thought of as a person being either at the North or South Pole, whereas a qubit can be anywhere on the surface of the globe -- its actual state is described by two parameters similar to latitude and longitude."

Make a practical quantum computer with enough qubits available and it could complete in minutes calculations that would take today's super-computers years, and your laptop perhaps millions of years.

The work by Thewalt and his fellow researchers opens up yet another avenue of research and application that may, in time, lead to practical breakthroughs in quantum computing.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Simon Fraser University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Steger, K. Saeedi, M. L. W. Thewalt, J. J. L. Morton, H. Riemann, N. V. Abrosimov, P. Becker, H.- J. Pohl. Quantum Information Storage for over 180 s Using Donor Spins in a 28Si 'Semiconductor Vacuum'. Science, 2012; 336 (6086): 1280 DOI: 10.1126/science.1217635

Cite This Page:

Simon Fraser University. "Quantum computers move closer to reality, thanks to highly enriched and highly purified silicon." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 June 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120607154138.htm>.
Simon Fraser University. (2012, June 7). Quantum computers move closer to reality, thanks to highly enriched and highly purified silicon. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120607154138.htm
Simon Fraser University. "Quantum computers move closer to reality, thanks to highly enriched and highly purified silicon." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120607154138.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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