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1960s-era anti-cancer drug points to treatments for Lou Gehrig's disease

Date:
June 13, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A long-used anti-cancer drug could be a starting point to develop new treatments for the incurable nerve disease known as Lou Gehrig's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), scientists are reporting. Their research shows how the drug prevents clumping of an enzyme linked to ALS.

A long-used anti-cancer drug could be a starting point to develop new treatments for the incurable nerve disease known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
Credit: Sean Parsons, ACS

A long-used anti-cancer drug could be a starting point to develop new treatments for the incurable nerve disease known as Lou Gehrig's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), scientists are reporting. Their research showing how the drug prevents clumping of an enzyme linked to ALS appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Lucia Banci, Ivano Bertini and colleagues explain that ALS causes a progressive loss of muscle control as the nerves that control body movements wither and die. Patients become weak and have difficulty swallowing and breathing, and most die within three to five years of diagnosis. Although some ALS cases are hereditary and run in families, about 90 percent are "sporadic," with the cause unknown. Some research links sporadic ALS to clumping of an antioxidant enzyme called hSOD1. The authors explored whether cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug used since the 1960s that is known to interact with some of the enzyme's amino acids, has any effect on hSOD1 clusters.

The scientists found that in laboratory tests, the anti-cancer drug cisplatin bound readily to the enzyme, preventing hSOD1 from aggregating and dissolving existing bunches. Cisplatin targets sites that can form bonds between hSOD1 after the enzyme loses the atom of copper it normally carries. The scientists note that cisplatin does not prevent the enzyme from performing its normal functions. "From this work it appears that cisplatin is a promising lead compound for the rational design of ALS treatments," the authors say.

The authors acknowledge funding from the Italian Research Project of National Interest (PRIN) and Bio-NMR.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lucia Banci, Ivano Bertini, Olga Blaževitš, Vito Calderone, Francesca Cantini, Jiafei Mao, Angela Trapananti, Miguela Vieru, Ilaria Amori, Mauro Cozzolino, Maria Teresa Carr. Interaction of Cisplatin with Human Superoxide Dismutase. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2012; 134 (16): 7009 DOI: 10.1021/ja211591n

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "1960s-era anti-cancer drug points to treatments for Lou Gehrig's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 June 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120613133245.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, June 13). 1960s-era anti-cancer drug points to treatments for Lou Gehrig's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120613133245.htm
American Chemical Society. "1960s-era anti-cancer drug points to treatments for Lou Gehrig's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120613133245.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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