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Simple new way to clean traces of impurities from drug ingredients

Date:
June 20, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting development of a simple new procedure for removing almost 98 percent of an important impurity that can contaminate prescription drugs and potentially increase the risk for adverse health effects in patients.

Scientists are reporting development of a simple new procedure for removing almost 98 percent of an important impurity that can contaminate prescription drugs and potentially increase the risk for adverse health effects in patients.

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Their report appears in ACS' journal Organic Process Research & Development.

Ecevit Yilmaz and colleagues note that contamination of medications with so-called "genotoxic" impurities (GTIs) have resulted in several major recent drug recalls. GTIs may be ingredients used to make drugs, or they may be formed during production of drugs, and can remain in the final product in minute amounts. The presence of one GTI in the anti-viral medication Viracept distributed in the European Union forced a recall in 2007. With GTIs an ongoing serious concern for the pharmaceutical industry, the scientists sought a better way to remove an important GTI called acrolein.

They describe development of a way to remove acrolein by using engineered particles based on silica and polystyrene. Mixing the particles in a drug solution contaminated with acrolein for 20 minutes resulted in removal of nearly 98 percent of the GTI without any substantial removal of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. They note that while the separation materials are readily available, there may be the need for more research on the method before using it to clean up pharmaceuticals on a commercial basis.

The authors acknowledge funding from the European Commission.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rustem Kecili, David Nivhede, Johan Billing, Mats Leeman, Börje Sellergren, Ecevit Yilmaz. Removal of Acrolein from Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Using Aldehyde Scavengers. Organic Process Research & Development, 2012; 120514094717006 DOI: 10.1021/op3000459

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Simple new way to clean traces of impurities from drug ingredients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 June 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120620113336.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, June 20). Simple new way to clean traces of impurities from drug ingredients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120620113336.htm
American Chemical Society. "Simple new way to clean traces of impurities from drug ingredients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120620113336.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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