Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Better treatment for brain cancer revealed by new molecular insights

Date:
July 9, 2012
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
Nearly a third of adults with the most common type of brain cancer develop recurrent, invasive tumors after being treated with a drug called bevacizumab. The molecular underpinnings behind these detrimental effects have now been deciphered. The findings reveal a new treatment strategy that could reduce tumor invasiveness and improve survival in these drug-resistant patients.

Nearly a third of adults with the most common type of brain cancer develop recurrent, invasive tumors after being treated with a drug called bevacizumab. The molecular underpinnings behind these detrimental effects have now been published by Cell Press in the July issue of Cancer Cell. The findings reveal a new treatment strategy that could reduce tumor invasiveness and improve survival in these drug-resistant patients.

"Understanding how and why these tumors adopt this invasive behavior is critical to being able to prevent this recurrence pattern and maximizing the benefits of bevacizumab," says study author Kan Lu of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of tumor originating in the brain. GBM tumors express high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that promotes the growth of new blood vessels that provide nutrients that allow tumors to expand. In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, for GBM patients who don't respond to first-line therapies. Although the drug is initially effective, up to 30% of patients develop tumors that infiltrate deep into the brain, making surgery and treatment difficult.

To study how bevacizumab can lead to adverse effects, senior study author Gabriele Bergers of UCSF and her collaborators focused on hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a protein that controls the growth and movement of cells, because they previously found a link between VEGF and HGF in GBM cells. In the new study, they found that VEGF inhibits the migration of GBM cells by decreasing HGF signaling through its receptor MET. Moreover, tumors were much less invasive -- and survival improved -- in mice with GBM tumors lacking both VEGF and MET rather than just VEGF alone. The results suggest that MET plays a critical role in GBM invasion when VEGF is blocked.

"These findings provide a rationale for therapeutically combining VEGF and MET inhibition so that patients can benefit from bevacizumab without developing more invasive tumors," Lu says. Because the VEGF and HGF/MET signaling pathways are active in a variety of tumors, this combined treatment strategy may also be applied to other types of cancer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. KanV. Lu, JeffreyP. Chang, ChristineA. Parachoniak, MelissaM. Pandika, ManishK. Aghi, David Meyronet, Nadezda Isachenko, ShaunD. Fouse, JoannaJ. Phillips, DavidA. Cheresh, Morag Park, Gabriele Bergers. VEGF Inhibits Tumor Cell Invasion and Mesenchymal Transition through a MET/VEGFR2 Complex. Cancer Cell, 2012; 22 (1): 21 DOI: 10.1016/j.ccr.2012.05.037

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Better treatment for brain cancer revealed by new molecular insights." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709133546.htm>.
Cell Press. (2012, July 9). Better treatment for brain cancer revealed by new molecular insights. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709133546.htm
Cell Press. "Better treatment for brain cancer revealed by new molecular insights." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709133546.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) As a third American missionary is confirmed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, doctors on the ground in West Africa fear they're losing the battle against the outbreak. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) When Facebook acquired the virtual reality hardware developer Oculus VR in March for $2 billion, CEO Mark Zuckerberg hailed the firm's technology as "a new communication platform." Duration: 02:24 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins