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New therapeutic target for prostate cancer identified

Date:
July 17, 2012
Source:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers
Summary:
A small, naturally occurring nucleic acid sequence, called a microRNA, known to regulate a number of different cancers, appears to alter the activity of the androgen receptor, which plays a critical role in prostate cancer. Directly targeting microRNA-125b to block androgen receptor activity represents a novel approach for treating castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

A small, naturally occurring nucleic acid sequence, called a microRNA, known to regulate a number of different cancers, appears to alter the activity of the androgen receptor, which plays a critical role in prostate cancer. Directly targeting microRNA-125b to block androgen receptor activity represents a novel approach for treating castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

This promising new strategy for improving the effectiveness of anti-androgenic and other hormonal therapies is described in an article in BioResearch Open Access, a new bimonthly peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. The article is available free online at the BioResearch Open Access website (http://www.liebertpub.com/biores).

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer affecting men and the second most common cause of cancer death among men. In the article "miR-125b Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling Via Modulation of the Receptor Complex Co-Repressor NCOR2," Xiaoping Yang, Lynne Bernis, Lih-Jen Su, Dexiang Gao, and Thomas Flaig, University of Colorado Denver (Aurora) and University of Minnesota (Duluth), looked for targets of microRNA-125b that might shed light on its role in regulating prostate cancer and found that it directly inhibits NCOR2, which acts to repress the androgen receptor. The authors point out that "the androgen receptor is a critical therapeutic target in prostate cancer" and that alterations in the receptor are essential for the development of castrate-resistant prostate cancer, in which the disease no longer responds to hormonal therapies.

"This research provides new insight into the mechanism of miR-125b regulation of castrate-resistance prostate cancer through the identification of a novel target for miR-125b," says Editor-in-Chief Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. "The clinical implications of this study are that targeted regulation of this miRNA may lead to more effective anticancer therapies."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Xiaoping Yang, Lynne Bemis, Lih-Jen Su, Dexiang Gao, and Thomas W. Flaig. miR-125b Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling Via Modulation of the Receptor Complex Co-Repressor NCOR2. BioResearch Open Access, 2012; 1 (2): 55-62 DOI: 10.1089/biores.2012.9903

Cite This Page:

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "New therapeutic target for prostate cancer identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120717111820.htm>.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. (2012, July 17). New therapeutic target for prostate cancer identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120717111820.htm
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "New therapeutic target for prostate cancer identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120717111820.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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