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Green plants reduce city street pollution up to eight times more than previously believed

Date:
July 18, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Trees, bushes and other greenery growing in the concrete-and-glass canyons of cities can reduce levels of two of the most worrisome air pollutants by eight times more than previously believed, a new study has found.

Trees, bushes and other greenery growing in the concrete-and-glass canyons of cities can reduce levels of two of the most worrisome air pollutants by eight times more than previously believed, a new study has found. A report on the research appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Thomas Pugh and colleagues explain that concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and microscopic particulate matter (PM) -- both of which can be harmful to human health -- exceed safe levels on the streets of many cities. Past research suggested that trees and other green plants can improve urban air quality by removing those pollutants from the air. However, the improvement seemed to be small, a reduction of less than 5 percent. The new study sought a better understanding of the effects of green plants in the sometimes stagnant air of city streets, which the authors term "urban street canyons."

The study concluded that judicious placement of grass, climbing ivy and other plants in urban canyons can reduce the concentration at street level of NO2 by as much as 40 percent and PM by 60 percent, much more than previously believed. The authors even suggest building plant-covered "green billboards" in these urban canyons to increase the amount of foliage. Trees were also shown to be effective, but only if care is taken to avoid trapping pollutants beneath their crowns.

The authors acknowledge funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Sustainable Urban Environment program.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Thomas A. M. Pugh, A. Robert MacKenzie, J. Duncan Whyatt, C. Nicholas Hewitt. Effectiveness of Green Infrastructure for Improvement of Air Quality in Urban Street Canyons. Environmental Science & Technology, 2012; 120628105341008 DOI: 10.1021/es300826w

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Green plants reduce city street pollution up to eight times more than previously believed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718143913.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, July 18). Green plants reduce city street pollution up to eight times more than previously believed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718143913.htm
American Chemical Society. "Green plants reduce city street pollution up to eight times more than previously believed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718143913.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

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