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New report describes seven essential steps toward an AIDS-free generation

Date:
July 19, 2012
Source:
Harvard School of Public Health
Summary:
The end of AIDS is within our reach. But as the authors point out, new financial investments -- and renewed commitments -- from countries around the world will be critical to fully implement proven treatment and prevention tools already at hand and to continue essential scientific research.

The end of AIDS is within our reach. But as the authors of a new special supplement in the August, 2012 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiencies (JAIDS) point out, new financial investments -- and renewed commitments -- from countries around the world will be critical to fully implement proven treatment and prevention tools already at hand and to continue essential scientific research.

"Only then will an AIDS-free generation be possible," write the supplement's editors -- Richard Marlink, Wafaa El-Sadr, Mariangela Simao and Elly Katabira -- in their introduction.

"Are we willing to pay the price to turn the dream into a reality?" they ask.

Entitled "Engaging to End the Epidemic: Seven Essential Steps Toward an AIDS-Free Generation," the supplement identifies the seven key areas where money and political will must be focused to end AIDS. These include:

  1. The promise and challenges of using antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to prevent HIV transmission
  2. New AIDS treatments, improving the ARV pipeline to treat those infected, and working toward a cure
  3. Enhancing the role of government leaders, the private sector, and non-governmental organizations (NGOS) in driving local and national responses to the epidemic
  4. Narrowing health disparities in preventing and treating AIDS caused by economic disempowerment, discrimination, and stigma
  5. Preventing AIDS transmission from mothers to babies in low- and middle-income countries where access to prevention services are most limited, but where new drug interventions show AIDS could be virtually eliminated in infants and children
  6. Funding the pursuit for AIDS vaccines, which are necessary to actually eliminate the disease
  7. Maximizing and growing current investments in the global AIDS response, rather than decreasing funding. In addition to its humanitarian impact, money spent going forward is a good global and local investment because improving and sustaining people's health enables them to be productive members of society contributing to the growth of their nations' economies.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Harvard School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marlink, Richard; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Simao, Mariangela; Katabira, Elly. Engaging to End the Epidemic: Seven Essential Steps Toward an AIDS-Free Generation. JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, August 1, 2012 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31826028d5

Cite This Page:

Harvard School of Public Health. "New report describes seven essential steps toward an AIDS-free generation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120719153305.htm>.
Harvard School of Public Health. (2012, July 19). New report describes seven essential steps toward an AIDS-free generation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120719153305.htm
Harvard School of Public Health. "New report describes seven essential steps toward an AIDS-free generation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120719153305.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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