Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

IL-10 from donor skin cells helps the body incorporate skin grafts

Date:
July 31, 2012
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Scientists have found that the anti-inflammatory molecule, IL-10, may improve success rates of skin autografts (skin moved from one site of the body to another). This information provides a valuable drug target that may benefit burn and accident victims.

New research suggests that keratinocytes are a major source of IL-10 production and that IL-10 is important for successful skin grafting between genetically identical mice.

Related Articles


Scientists have found that the anti-inflammatory molecule, IL-10, may improve success rates of skin autografts (skin moved from one site of the body to another). This information provides a valuable drug target that may benefit burn and accident victims. Specifically, researchers from Portugal and Brazil show that IL-10 plays an important role in whether or not an isogenic skin graft (skin from one individual grafted into another genetically identical) is successful and that the cells responsible for this effect are from the donor skin and not from any tissue of the recipient. This finding appears in the August 2012 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology.

"Much work is needed to advance from mouse experiments to finding in humans," said Luciana Vieira de Moraes, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Disease Genetics Lab at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciκncia in Oeiras, Portugal. "However, monitoring IL-10 levels in the graft tissue may improve therapeutic success."

To make this discovery, scientists conducted experiments using different groups of mice, some of which were genetically modified to not produce IL-10. The first group, which produced IL-10, received a tail skin graft from mice that lacked IL-10. These grafts were not accepted by the recipient. The second group that did not produce IL-10 received tail skin from donors that had IL-10. In this case grafts were accepted. These findings suggest that IL-10 is important immediately after transplantation.

"This study shows that donor skin is not a passive player in the grafting process. Indeed, immune cells in the skin play an active role in whether or not the graft is accepted or rejected by the body. While considerable work remains, these findings open the door to exploit the IL-10 pathway to aid in skin grafting procedures in a variety of clinical settings," said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. Takiishi, C. E. Tadokoro, L. V. Rizzo, L. V. de Moraes. Early IL-10 production is essential for syngeneic graft acceptance. Journal of Leukocyte Biology, 2012; 92 (2): 259 DOI: 10.1189/jlb.1111569

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "IL-10 from donor skin cells helps the body incorporate skin grafts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120731111420.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2012, July 31). IL-10 from donor skin cells helps the body incorporate skin grafts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120731111420.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "IL-10 from donor skin cells helps the body incorporate skin grafts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120731111420.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) — Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) — Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

Despite Rising Death Toll, Many Survive Ebola

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) — The family of a Dallas nurse infected with Ebola in the US says doctors can no longer detect the virus in her. Despite the mounting death toll in West Africa, there are survivors there too. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) — Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins