Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Too cool to follow the law: Viscous materials do not follow standard laws below a sub-melting point threshold

Date:
August 1, 2012
Source:
Springer Science+Business Media
Summary:
So-called glass-formers are a class of highly viscous liquid materials that have the consistency of honey and turn into brittle glass once cooled to sufficiently low temperatures. Scientists have elucidated the behavior of these materials as they are on the verge of turning into glass. Although scientists do not yet thoroughly understand their behavior when approaching the glassy state, this new study, which relies on an additional type of dynamic measurements, clearly shows that they do not behave like more simple fluids, referred to as "activated" fluids.

So-called glass-formers are a class of highly viscous liquid materials that have the consistency of honey and turn into brittle glass once cooled to sufficiently low temperatures. Zhen Chen and his colleagues from Arizona State University, USA, have elucidated the behaviour of these materials as they are on the verge of turning into glass in an article about to be published in The European Physical Journal E.

Related Articles


Although scientists do not yet thoroughly understand their behaviour when approaching the glassy state, this new study, which relies on an additional type of dynamic measurements, clearly shows that they do not behave like more simple fluids, referred to as "activated" fluids. This is contrary to recent reports.

Typically, the dynamics of materials are described using a formula called the Arrhenius law, which is well known for chemical reaction rates. It states that a very simple law regulates how temperature affects characteristics such as viscosity and relaxation times -i.e., delay in returning to equilibrium after the material has been subjected to a perturbation.

The authors used a so-called "residuals" analysis to show that Arrhenius type dynamics is not a common behaviour at temperatures between a sub-melting point threshold, called the crossover temperature, which occurs at a dynamic transition point, and the glass transition temperature, where the liquid becomes a glassy solid.

Zhen Chen and co-authors came to this conclusion by analysing not only the material's viscosity but also more precise data on the dielectric relaxation time available within the same temperature range. This gave them a more exact account of relaxation dynamic properties in highly viscous materials.

The study revealed the need for greater precision in the viscosity data of glass-former materials to avoid masking its actual behaviour from data treatment and graphical representation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer Science+Business Media. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Z. Chen, C. A. Angell, R. Richert. On the dynamics of liquids in their viscous regime approaching the glass transition. The European Physical Journal E, 2012; 35 (7) DOI: 10.1140/epje/i2012-12065-2

Cite This Page:

Springer Science+Business Media. "Too cool to follow the law: Viscous materials do not follow standard laws below a sub-melting point threshold." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120801093626.htm>.
Springer Science+Business Media. (2012, August 1). Too cool to follow the law: Viscous materials do not follow standard laws below a sub-melting point threshold. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120801093626.htm
Springer Science+Business Media. "Too cool to follow the law: Viscous materials do not follow standard laws below a sub-melting point threshold." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120801093626.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Inspectors Found Faulty Work Before NYC Blast

Inspectors Found Faulty Work Before NYC Blast

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) An hour before an apparent gas explosion sent flames soaring and debris flying at a Manhattan apartment building, injuring 19 people, utility company inspectors decided the work being done there was faulty. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) Facebook on Thursday revealed more details about its Internet-connected drone project. The drone is bigger than a 737, but lighter than a car. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Mar. 27, 2015) The companion robot "Kirobo" returns to earth from the International Space Station and sets two Guinness World Records. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Witness Building Explosion, Collapse

Residents Witness Building Explosion, Collapse

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) Witnesses recount the sites and sounds of a massive explosion and subsequent building collapse in the heart of Manhattan&apos;s trendy East Village on Thursday. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins