Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New simulation method produces realistic fluid movements

Date:
September 26, 2012
Source:
University of Copenhagen
Summary:
What does a yogurt look like over time? The food industry will soon be able to answer this question using a new fluid simulation tool.

The dynamic model.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Copenhagen

What does a yoghurt look like over time? The food industry will soon be able to answer this question using a new fluid simulation tool developed by the Department of Computer Science (DIKU) at the University of Copenhagen as part of a broad partnership with other research institutions. An epoch-making shift in the way we simulate the physical world is now a reality.

Related Articles


A five-year collaboration between the University of Copenhagen, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and the Alexandra Institute on simulating fluids in movement is now bearing fruit, and has earned the group a 'best paper award' at the Symposium on Computer Animation (SCA).

"Our new method is a breakthrough which will radically change tomorrow's computer simulation. We have taken the first step towards producing a more precise simulation of fluid materials than anything seen so far. Now we are looking forward to testing the method on a number of other materials with soft structures," says Associate Professor Kenny Erleben from the University of Copenhagen.

Goodbye to statistical methods

The new fluid simulation tool can boast of being very similar to physical reality.

The method distinguishes itself significantly from known simulation methods which use mesh structures where the vertices are locked in a fixed position. In the new method, the mesh structure is replaced by a dynamic structure where the vertices move one at a time.

This makes it possible to take account of the fluid's physical properties more precisely and to see how different types of fluids interact with one another.

The method also ensures such a high degree of detail that even very thin structures become visible. With previous statistical methods, it is often a problem that the simulated object's edges and structures become blurred, and that its precise physical properties are hard to recreate.

Food risk assessments and shelf-life

The new dynamic simulation method paves the way for countless applications.

First, as the company backing the research, the food producer Danisco wants to use the method to simulate the shelf-life of foods, for example yoghurt.

However, the research can also be used to perform risk assessments of, for example, oil slips and within building design.

For Kenny Erleben, it will be interesting to use the method to simulate the human body, for example clothing, hair, skin and patterns of movement.

But for the time being, the method cannot be used by what has traditionally been simulation research's biggest customers: games developers. This is because the simulation is extremely time-consuming as the vertices are moved one at a time.

It often takes a couple of minutes per image just for the simulation -- added to which is the time it takes to generate the detailed images. Optimising the calculation times will therefore be one of the main focus areas in the ongoing research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Copenhagen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Copenhagen. "New simulation method produces realistic fluid movements." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120926110112.htm>.
University of Copenhagen. (2012, September 26). New simulation method produces realistic fluid movements. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120926110112.htm
University of Copenhagen. "New simulation method produces realistic fluid movements." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120926110112.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) Zipping around at 800-miles an hour is coming closer to reality in California. An entire town is being built around Elon Musk&apos;s Hyperloop concept and it wants you to stop in for a ride when it&apos;s ready. Brett Larson is on board. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 26, 2015) Dutch scientists have developed a smart bicycle that uses sensors, wireless technology and video to warn riders of traffic dangers. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Robot dogs are the perfect pet for some in Japan who go to repairmen-turned-vets when their pooch breaks down - while a full Buddhist funeral ceremony awaits those who don&apos;t make it. Duration: 02:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins