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Dollars for donors: Many support financial incentives to encourage organ donation

Date:
September 27, 2012
Source:
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)
Summary:
Most Canadians view financial incentives for deceased kidney donation to be acceptable, according to a new study. Nearly half of the general public in Canada also find it acceptable for living kidney donation. Studies are now needed to determine whether acceptability of financial incentives translates to more available organs to patients in critical need of a transplant.

Most Canadians view financial incentives for deceased kidney donation to be acceptable, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). Nearly half of the general public in Canada also find it acceptable for living kidney donation. Studies are now needed to determine whether acceptability of financial incentives translates to more available organs to patients in critical need of a transplant.

Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for patients with kidney failure. Unfortunately, there's a shortage of kidneys available to those in need of a transplant, and donation rates from both living and deceased donors have remained relatively unchanged over the last decade.

Lianne Barnieh, PhD, Braden Manns, MD (University of Calgary, in Canada) and their colleagues looked to see whether financial incentives to increase donation are acceptable and whether they would change individuals' willingness to consider donation. To accomplish this, they administered a questionnaire in the fall of 2011 to 2,004 members of the Canadian public, 339 health professionals, and 268 people with or affected by kidney disease.

Among the major findings:

• 70% and 40% of respondents found financial incentives to be acceptable for deceased and living donors, respectively.

• 45%, 14%, and 27% of the public, health professionals, and people with or affected by kidney disease, respectively, supported monetary payment as a financial incentive for living donors.

• Overall, reimbursement of funeral expenses for deceased donors and a tax break for living donors were the most acceptable forms of financial incentives.

The authors also examined people's differences in opinion based on household income. "We did not find evidence that those with lower income would be more likely to donate for financial gain. Though it is not possible to determine through a questionnaire whether a system of financial incentives would exploit those with lower income, the results in our questionnaire did not show any evidence of this," said Dr. Barnieh.

Future research should examine whether financial incentives might increase donations from deceased and living kidney donors.

Study co-authors include Scott Klarenbach, MD, John Gill, MD, and Tim Caulfield, LLM.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lianne Barnieh, Braden Manns et al. Attitudes Toward Strategies to Increase Organ Donation: Views of the General Public and Health Professionals. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, September 27, 2012 DOI: 10.2215/CJN.04100412

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "Dollars for donors: Many support financial incentives to encourage organ donation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120927174334.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). (2012, September 27). Dollars for donors: Many support financial incentives to encourage organ donation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120927174334.htm
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "Dollars for donors: Many support financial incentives to encourage organ donation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120927174334.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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