Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Key mechanism for controlling the body's inflammatory response discovered

Date:
September 30, 2012
Source:
Queen Mary, University of London
Summary:
Researchers have discovered how a key molecule controls the body's inflammatory responses. The molecule, known as p110delta, fine-tunes inflammation to avoid excessive reactions that can damage the organism. The findings could be exploited in vaccine development and new cancer therapies.

Researchers at Queen Mary, University of London have discovered how a key molecule controls the body's inflammatory responses. The molecule, known as p110delta, fine-tunes inflammation to avoid excessive reactions that can damage the organism. The findings, published in Nature Immunology September 30, could be exploited in vaccine development and new cancer therapies.

Related Articles


A healthy immune system reacts to danger signals -- from microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses, or from the body's own rogue cells, such as cancer cells. This tightly controlled reaction starts with an inflammatory phase that alerts and activates the body to react against the danger signals. Once the danger has been cleared, it is critical that the body's inflammatory phase is shut down to avoid overreaction.

Control over the timing of inflammation is essential and is disrupted in a range of diseases: inflammation that is triggered too quickly or not controlled appropriately can lead to a potentially lethal endotoxic (septic) shock or, in a more chronic state, contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, asthma and multiple sclerosis.

A better understanding of the control mechanisms involved in orchestrating the body's inflammatory response will help in the development of better and more targeted treatments for a variety of diseases.

Professor Bart Vanhaesebroeck, from the Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary, University of London, who supervised the research, said: "For years scientists have been puzzled by the way in which p110delta can both fuel and restrain inflammatory reactions in the body. Thanks to the improved understanding that we have achieved through use of genetics and pharmacology, we have now identified one of the specific pathways that p110delta controls."

The researchers found that p110delta balances the immune response by regulating a particular type of immune cell, the dendritic cell. These cells sense and initiate an immune response, primarily provoking inflammation when they encounter "foreign bodies," including bacteria. By using dendritic cells from mice that lacked active p110delta, the study found that p110delta controls the transition of a bacteria-sensing receptor (TLR4) from the surface of the dendritic cell into its interior, a key step which allows the dendritic cell to initiate the shut-down phase of the inflammation.

Dr Ezra Aksoy, from the Barts Cancer Institute, the first author of the paper, said: "Temporarily interfering with p110delta activity could allow us to modulate the balance between the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways, opening up new therapeutic avenues to be exploited in the fields of vaccination, cancer immunotherapy and chronic inflammatory diseases."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen Mary, University of London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ezra Aksoy, Salma Taboubi, David Torres, Sandrine Delbauve, Abderrahman Hachani, Maria A Whitehead, Wayne P Pearce, Inma Berenjeno-Martin, Gemma Nock, Alain Filloux, Rudi Beyaert, Veronique Flamand, Bart Vanhaesebroeck. The p110δ isoform of the kinase PI(3)K controls the subcellular compartmentalization of TLR4 signaling and protects from endotoxic shock. Nature Immunology, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/ni.2426

Cite This Page:

Queen Mary, University of London. "Key mechanism for controlling the body's inflammatory response discovered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120930142100.htm>.
Queen Mary, University of London. (2012, September 30). Key mechanism for controlling the body's inflammatory response discovered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120930142100.htm
Queen Mary, University of London. "Key mechanism for controlling the body's inflammatory response discovered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120930142100.htm (accessed December 25, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

FDA Issues New Warning About Pure Caffeine Powder Usage

FDA Issues New Warning About Pure Caffeine Powder Usage

Newsy (Dec. 24, 2014) The FDA cites two deaths this year linked to pure caffeine powder as warnings of the potentially fatal substance. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Alarming CDC Lab Report Reveals Ebola Sample Mix-Up

Alarming CDC Lab Report Reveals Ebola Sample Mix-Up

Newsy (Dec. 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report claiming a lab tech in Atlanta might have been exposed to the Ebola virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
French General Physicians Begin Strike, ER Doctors Back to Work

French General Physicians Begin Strike, ER Doctors Back to Work

AFP (Dec. 23, 2014) French doctors went on strike Tuesday in protest at an upcoming health bill. Emergency room doctors on the other end are returning to work after reaching an historic agreement. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Malpractice Suit Changes Rule for Cruise Ships

Malpractice Suit Changes Rule for Cruise Ships

AP (Dec. 23, 2014) A recent court ruling may have opened the courthouse door for cruise ship passengers who claim poor treatment by ship medical personnel. (Dec. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins