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Marathon runners may be at risk for incontinence

Date:
October 4, 2012
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
While many marathon runners may be preoccupied with shin splints, chafing and blisters come race day, one thing they may not consider is their bladder health.

While many marathon runners may be preoccupied with shin splints, chafing and blisters come race day, one thing they may not consider is their bladder health.

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"The added stress on the body that comes with running a marathon can cause urinary stress incontinence problems during the race or down the road," said Melinda Abernethy, MD, fellow, Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "People who already suffer from incontinence also are at risk for bladder-control issues while running."

Urinary stress incontinence is the loss of urine from physical activity such as coughing, sneezing and running. It is the most common form of incontinence, which impacts women more often than men.

Researchers from Loyola University Health System will partner with the Chicago Area Runners Association to study the relationship between long-distance running and pelvic floor disorders.

"This study will help us to better understand the link between endurance running and pelvic floor disorders including incontinence," Dr. Abernethy said.

Until we know more, Dr. Abernethy recommends that runners should monitor their fluid intake and go to the bathroom at least every few hours during a marathon.

"Putting off going to the bathroom during the race is not healthy for your bladder," Dr. Abernethy said. "Runners also should avoid diuretics, such as coffee or tea, before the race, because this can stimulate the bladder and cause you to visit the bathroom more frequently."

Dr. Abernethy adds that pelvic floor exercises such as kegels, may help runners prevent urine leakage during the race. However, runners should speak with their doctor, if they experience bladder-control problems during or after the marathon.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "Marathon runners may be at risk for incontinence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121004162858.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2012, October 4). Marathon runners may be at risk for incontinence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121004162858.htm
Loyola University Health System. "Marathon runners may be at risk for incontinence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121004162858.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

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