Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New study aims to predict risk of cancer

Date:
October 16, 2012
Source:
University of Southampton
Summary:
New research in the United Kingdom aims to develop a way of predicting who is more at risk of getting cancer.

New research at the University of Southampton aims to develop a way of predicting who is more at risk of getting cancer.

Led by Paul Little, Professor of Primary Care Research, the CANcer DIagnosis Decision rules (CANDID) study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) School for Primary Care Research (NIHR SPCR), will collect and analyse clinical information and blood samples from 20,000 patients who have had lung or colon cancer. The aim is to determine which signs and symptoms are most predictive of those who go on to be diagnosed with the disease.

Genetic testing will be carried out after the recruitment phase of the study to establish how much extra information genetics provides over and above the clinical information.

The 2 million five-year study is the largest award made by the NIHR SPCR and aims to improve the referral process patients go through before being diagnosed. Currently GPs must refer urgent cases within two weeks and for other cases, up to 62 days for referral; however it has been reported that some patients have to wait much longer and some have visited their GP more than once before being referred.

Professor Little comments: "We need to improve both the early referral rates for cancer but, at the same time, we do not want to overload the system with lots of people who are at a low risk of having cancer and may have negative side-effects of being over-investigated. Waiting for results and dealing with the possibility of having cancer can be a distressing and daunting time for patients and their families, our research aims to aid the patient pathway and help medical professionals, so every patient is dealt with in the most appropriate way and in a timely fashion."

The study will use patient samples from the eight centres within the NIHR National School for Primary Research: Southampton, Oxford, Bristol, Birmingham, Nottingham, University College London, Manchester and Keele.

The NIHR SPCR Director, Professor Richard Hobbs adds: 'The NIHR School for Primary Care Research is pleased to be supporting this ambitious new study, the funding for which was made possible after we had redesigned the way that the School funds its research to enable larger, collaborative, longer term research to compete with short term single centre studies.

"The UK presently spends only around 5 per cent of its overall health research budgets on prevention and for many diseases, and cancer in particular, the earlier it is recognised and diagnosed, the better the prognosis or outcomes. This is why CANDID is important for patients and the NHS. Pleasingly, this major prospective research also builds on earlier research into symptoms that may predict cancer based on retrospective data, some of which was also supported by the NIHR SPCR."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southampton. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Southampton. "New study aims to predict risk of cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016204147.htm>.
University of Southampton. (2012, October 16). New study aims to predict risk of cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016204147.htm
University of Southampton. "New study aims to predict risk of cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016204147.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins