Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low calcium diet linked to higher risk of hormone condition in women

Date:
October 18, 2012
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
A low calcium diet is associated with a higher risk of developing a common hormone condition in women, known as primary hyperparathyroidism, a new study suggests.

A low calcium diet is associated with a higher risk of developing a common hormone condition in women, known as primary hyperparathyroidism, suggests a study published on bmj.com.

Primary hyperparathyroidism or PHPT is caused by overactive parathyroid glands secreting too much parathyroid hormone, which can result in weak bones, fractures and kidney stones. In recent years, several studies have also suggested a link between untreated PHPT and an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.

PHPT affects one in 800 people during their lifetime. It is most common in post-menopausal women between 50-60 years of age.

Calcium intake is known to influence parathyroid hormone production and therefore may be important in the development of PHPT. However, no study to date has explored this relation in detail over many years.

So a team of US-based researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to examine the association between calcium intake and risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism in women.

They tracked 58,354 US women participating in the Nurses' Health Study I aged between 39 and 66 years in 1986 with no history of PHPT. Calcium intake (from both dietary sources and supplements) was assessed every four years using food frequency questionnaires over a 22-year period.

During follow-up, 277 cases of PHPT were confirmed.

Women were divided into five equal groups, according to intake of dietary calcium. After adjusting for several factors including age, body mass index and ethnicity, women in the group with the highest intake of dietary calcium had a 44% reduced risk of developing PHPT compared with the group with the lowest intake.

Even for women taking a modest 500 mg/day of calcium supplements, the risk of developing PHPT was 59% lower than those taking no calcium supplements.

Further analyses to test these results did not significantly change the association between calcium intake and risk of PHPT.

The authors point out that "there could be unknown confounders that we did not control for in our analysis." However, they conclude: "Increased calcium intake, including both dietary and supplemental calcium, is independently associated with a reduced risk of developing primary hyperparathyroidism in women."

And they suggest that future research "should examine other environmental and lifestyle risk factors that could chronically stimulate the parathyroid gland and thereby affect subsequent development of primary hyperparathyroidism."

An accompanying editorial says this study "provides evidence to support physicians in confidently encouraging female patients to take calcium supplements."

James Norman, Chief of Surgery at the Norman Parathyroid Center in Florida argues that daily calcium supplements in modest doses "are likely to provide more benefits than risks" …. and, over many years, even a moderate increase in calcium concentration probably helps reduce the incidence of parathyroid tumors."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Paik JM, Curhan GC, Taylor EN. Calcium intake and risk of primary hyperparathyroidism in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ, 2012; 345: e6390 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e6390
  2. J. Norman. Increased calcium intake may reduce risk of primary hyperparathyroidism. BMJ, 2012; 345: e6646 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e6646

Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Low calcium diet linked to higher risk of hormone condition in women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018185921.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2012, October 18). Low calcium diet linked to higher risk of hormone condition in women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018185921.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Low calcium diet linked to higher risk of hormone condition in women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121018185921.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins