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Smoke-free laws led quickly to fewer hospitalizations

Date:
October 29, 2012
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Comprehensive smoke-free laws were associated with a rapid 15 percent decrease in hospitalizations for heart attacks, 16 percent for stroke and 24 percent for asthma and other respiratory hospitalizations. The most comprehensive laws -- those covering workplaces, restaurants and bars -- resulted in more health benefits.

Smoke-free legislation was associated with substantially fewer hospitalizations and deaths from heart and respiratory diseases, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

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Researchers reviewed 45 studies covering 33 smoke-free laws at the local and state levels around the United States and from countries as varied as Uruguay, New Zealand and Germany and found:

  • Comprehensive smoke-free laws were associated with a rapid 15 percent decrease in heart attack hospitalizations and 16 percent decrease in stroke hospitalizations.
  • Smoke-free laws were also rapidly followed by a 24 percent decrease in hospitalizations for respiratory diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • The most comprehensive laws -- those covering workplaces, restaurants and bars -- resulted in the highest health benefits.

"The public, health professionals and policy makers need to understand that including exemptions and loopholes in legislation -- such as exempting casinos -- condemns more people to end up in emergency rooms," said Stanton Glantz, Ph.D., senior study author and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco. "These unnecessary hospitalizations are the real cost of failing to enact comprehensive smoke-free legislation."

The findings support the American Heart Association's position that smoke-free laws should be comprehensive and apply to all workplaces and public environments, including restaurants, bars and casinos. The analysis also is consistent with other studies that have found smoke-free laws were followed by significant decreases in acute heart attack and other cardiac-related hospital admissions.

"Stronger legislation means immediate reductions in secondhand smoke-related health problems as a byproduct of reductions in secondhand smoke exposure and increases in smoking cessation that accompany these laws," Glantz said. "Passage of these laws formalize and accelerate social change and the associated immediate health benefits."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Crystal E. Tan and Stanton A. Glantz. Association Between Smoke-Free Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis. Circulation, 2012;126:2177-2183 DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.121301

Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Smoke-free laws led quickly to fewer hospitalizations." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029170936.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2012, October 29). Smoke-free laws led quickly to fewer hospitalizations. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029170936.htm
American Heart Association. "Smoke-free laws led quickly to fewer hospitalizations." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121029170936.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

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'Smoke-Free' Laws Lead to Fewer Hospitalizations and Deaths

Nov. 6, 2012 Laws that end smoking at work and other public places result in significantly fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes, asthma and other respiratory conditions, a new analysis has ... read more

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