Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Smoke-free' laws lead to fewer hospitalizations and deaths

Date:
November 6, 2012
Source:
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)
Summary:
Laws that end smoking at work and other public places result in significantly fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes, asthma and other respiratory conditions, a new analysis has found.

Laws that end smoking at work and other public places result in significantly fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes, asthma and other respiratory conditions, a new UCSF analysis has found.

The research provides evidence that smoke-free laws that cover workplaces, restaurants and bars have the biggest impacts on hospitalizations, reduce health care costs and also raise quality of life, the researchers said.

The research is published in the current issue of the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

"The public, health professionals, and policy makers need to understand that including exemptions and loopholes in legislation -- such as exempting casinos -- condemns more people to end up in emergency rooms," said senior author Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, UCSF professor of medicine and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at UCSF.

"These unnecessary hospitalizations are the real cost of failing to enact comprehensive smoke-free legislation," he said.

For decades, Glantz and his colleagues at UCSF have been pioneers in tobacco research, disclosing how the tobacco industry manipulated its products and led the public into cigarette addiction.

In the latest study, the scientists examined the relationship between legislated smoking bans and hospital admissions or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases.

The inquiry consisted of a meta-analysis of 45 studies published prior to November 30, 2011. Altogether, the research covered 33 different smoke-free-laws in cities and states around the United States as well as several countries, including New Zealand and Germany. The laws variously prohibit smoking in such public spots as restaurants, bars, and the workplace.

The authors found that comprehensive smoke-free laws were followed rapidly by significantly lower rates of hospital admissions than before the laws went into force:

A 15 percent drop in heart attack hospitalizations;

A 16 percent drop in stroke hospitalizations;

A 24 percent drop in hospitalizations for respiratory diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Laws that were more comprehensive in scope -- that included restaurants and bars as well as workplaces -- were followed by larger changes in risk, the authors said. Moreover, the decrease in hospitalizations applied similarly to women and to men, the researchers found.

The authors noted several studies that showed an additional benefit: lower health care costs connected to smoking-related illnesses. The savings reported ranged from $302,000 for acute myocardial infarctions in one small Mississippi town, to $6.9 million the first year after smoke-free laws were implemented in one province in Germany.

"Smoke-free legislation…reduces exposure of nonsmokers to secondhand smoke and creates an environment that helps smokers cut down or quit smoking," the authors wrote. "The passage of these laws reflects changes in social norms that also affect smoking behavior; the laws both formalize and accelerate this social change and the associated health benefits."

The research was supported by National Cancer Institute grants CA-61021 and CA-87472.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The original article was written by Elizabeth Fernandez. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Crystal E. Tan, Stanton A. Glantz. Association Between Smoke-Free Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Respiratory Diseases A Meta-Analysis. Circulation, 2012 DOI: 10.1161/%u200BCIRCULATIONAHA.112.121301

Cite This Page:

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). "'Smoke-free' laws lead to fewer hospitalizations and deaths." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121106191700.htm>.
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). (2012, November 6). 'Smoke-free' laws lead to fewer hospitalizations and deaths. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121106191700.htm
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). "'Smoke-free' laws lead to fewer hospitalizations and deaths." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121106191700.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

More Coverage


Smoke-Free Laws Led Quickly to Fewer Hospitalizations

Oct. 29, 2012 Comprehensive smoke-free laws were associated with a rapid 15 percent decrease in hospitalizations for heart attacks, 16 percent for stroke and 24 percent for asthma and other respiratory ... read more
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins