Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Youth violence declining in United Kingdom, study finds

Date:
December 4, 2012
Source:
University of Hertfordshire
Summary:
Physical violence among young people is on the decline overall in nearly thirty countries including the UK, according to a new international study.

Physical violence among young people is on the decline overall in nearly thirty countries including the UK, according to a new international study involving researchers from the University of Hertfordshire.

Youth violence is a major concern in most countries with physical fighting being the most common sign of such violence. The study's findings show that investment in violence prevention programmes and other support networks do make a difference for the world's youth.

Professor Fiona Brooks, at the University of Hertfordshire's Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care, said: "Over the last decade in the UK, a wide range of programmes have been made available to healthcare workers and educators to reduce violence and associated triggers.

"These programmes have proven effective and have helped to lower the rates of violence in the UK. Such programmes include developing life skills in children and young people, working with young people who are potentially violent, as well as reducing the availability and misuse of alcohol."

In addition, many schools across England have signed up to the UNICEF UK's Rights Respecting Schools Award. This is a UK-wide initiative which helps schools to use the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child at the heart of a school's values. It teaches the rights and respects in all school relationships: not only those between teachers and their pupils, but also between pupils. Evidence suggests that this programme may reduce bullying and also help create a more supportive school culture which helps protect young people from developing a tendency towards violence.

Although violence among young people dropped in the UK and the majority of countries in the study, Ukraine, Latvia and Greece were the only countries that did not show a reduction in youth violence among young people. This could be a reflection of the instability and turmoil these countries have experienced in recent years.

A variety of factors predict the occurrence of violence among young people according to the study. These include:

  • being born male
  • living in low income countries
  • living in more violent cultures with higher murder rates
  • engaging in risk-taking behaviours including tobacco, marijuana and/or alcohol use
  • victimisation by bullying.

The in-depth results from the study will influence decisions in directing resources to these adolescent groups which are at risk of using violence. Strategies include family-based training, minimising violence in public media, and school-based anti-violence programs and counselling.

Other members of the research team include Candace Currie (University of St. Andrews) and William Pickett (Queen's University, Canada). The University of St. Andrews coordinated the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Hertfordshire. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. W. Pickett, M. Molcho, F. J. Elgar, F. Brooks, M. de Looze, K. Rathmann, T. F. M. ter Bogt, S. Nic Gabhainn, D. Sigmundova, M. Gaspar de Matos, W. Craig, S. D. Walsh, Y. Harel-Fisch, C. Currie. Trends and Socioeconomic Correlates of Adolescent Physical Fighting in 30 Countries. Pediatrics, 2012; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1614

Cite This Page:

University of Hertfordshire. "Youth violence declining in United Kingdom, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204081236.htm>.
University of Hertfordshire. (2012, December 4). Youth violence declining in United Kingdom, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204081236.htm
University of Hertfordshire. "Youth violence declining in United Kingdom, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204081236.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) — Nine years after Hurricane Katrina, charter schools are the new reality of public education in New Orleans. The state of Louisiana took over most of the city's public schools after the killer storm in 2005. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) — Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Kids' Drawings At Age 4 Linked To Intelligence At Age 14

Kids' Drawings At Age 4 Linked To Intelligence At Age 14

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) — A study by King's College London says there's a link between how well kids draw at age 4 and how intelligent they are later in life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins