Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Pre-clinical data suggests Angiocidin effective against leukemia

Date:
December 9, 2012
Source:
Temple University
Summary:
Angiocidin, a novel tumor-inhibiting protein, has shown in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against acute myeloid leukemia cells in pre-clinical experiments.

Angiocidin, a novel tumor-inhibiting protein, has been shown to reduce acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells in vivo by almost two-thirds in pre-clinical experiments.

George P. Tuszynski, a professor of neuroscience in Temple University's School of Medicine who discovered Angiocidin, will present the findings during the American Society of Hematology's national meeting in Atlanta on Dec. 9.

AML causes certain white blood cells to stop maturing, resulting in their uncontrolled proliferation, which can lead to suppression of the immune system and often fatal secondary problems such as infections, including pneumonia, and an increased risk for bleeding.

In earlier in vitro studies using four AML cell lines and patient AML cells, Angiocidin demonstrated the ability to stimulate maturation in the affected white cells, causing them to behave and function like normal cells.

With 50 percent success in the in vitro patient studies, the researchers next focused on how Angiocidin would perform against cells from AML patients in vivo. Samples from a patient were injected into a special mouse model developed by Martin Carroll, associate professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Over a 14 week period, the leukemia cells engrafted to the bone marrow of the mice.

The mice were then given doses of Ara-C, Angiocidin or a combination of both. The chemotherapy agent Ara-C, or cytosine arabinoside, is standard-of-care for AML and kills cancer cells by inhibiting DNA synthesis.

Mice treated only with Angiocidin saw a 63 percent reduction in AML cells, while those treated with both experienced a 79 percent reduction in AML cells. Mice treated with Ara-C alone saw a reduction of only around 40 percent.

"One question we had is whether Angiocidin would be able to get into the bone marrow," said Tuszynski. "These results clearly show that Angiocidin is able to prevent the growth of AML cells in the bone marrow." However, Tuszynski cautioned that pre-clinical data is not always predictive of activity in humans.

While Ara-C and other drugs used to treat AML are highly toxic, Angiocidin has exhibited no evidence of toxicity, making it a potentially safer alternative treatment to standard-of-care, especially for elderly patients who can't tolerate chemotherapy.

Tuszynski said that additional pre-clinical tests are being performed to gather more data and to determine an optimal dose of Angiocidin for patients. "Once we have all of our pre-clinical data together, we will be able to begin preparing for a clinical trial in humans," he said.

The pre-clinical testing of Angiocidin has been funded through a grant from Philadelphia's University City Science Center.

A start-up company, Diffregen LLC, has licensed Angiocidin from Temple. They recently submitted a small business innovation research (SBIR) grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health to support product development activities for this novel treatment for AML and potentially other cancers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Temple University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Temple University. "Pre-clinical data suggests Angiocidin effective against leukemia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121209152523.htm>.
Temple University. (2012, December 9). Pre-clinical data suggests Angiocidin effective against leukemia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121209152523.htm
Temple University. "Pre-clinical data suggests Angiocidin effective against leukemia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121209152523.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins