Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study identifies infants at highest risk of death from pertussis; Early and repeated white blood cell counts are a critical tool

Date:
January 10, 2013
Source:
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Summary:
A new study has found that taking early and repeated white blood cell counts is critical in determining whether infants have pertussis and which of those children are at highest risk of death from the disease.

A study released today from the upcoming issue of the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (JPIDS) found that taking early and repeated white blood cell counts (WBC) is critical in determining whether infants have pertussis and which of those children are at highest risk of death from the disease.

In 2010, California reported its highest pertussis rates in 60 years. Murray, et al.'s retrospective study used medical records from five Southern California Pediatric Intensive Care Units between September 2009 and June 2011. Of the 31 infants studied, eight comprised a group considered to have more severe infections, which included suffering from pulmonary hypertension and death from the pertussis.

The study showed that infants who had more severe disease had higher WBC counts and were more likely to show at least a 50% increase in WBC. Infants with more severe disease had median peak WBC counts of 74,100 compared to 24,200 among infants with less severe disease. All but one of those with more severe disease had at least a 50% increase in WBC within 48 hours, and none of those infants with less severe disease had more than a 50% increase in WBC.

Additionally, the group of infants with more severe infections had higher maximum heart and respiratory rates and was more likely to develop pneumonia. All of these conditions occurred earlier after illness onset among infants with more severe disease. This group was more likely to have seizures, hypotension/shock, renal failure, and was more likely to be intubated and receive exchange transfusions. Six of the infants received exchange transfusions, and four of those died. Those four were all in shock at the time of their transfusions; the two who survived were not in shock at the time of transfusion.

Also known as whooping cough, pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial infection of the respiratory tract. Most children are vaccinated against pertussis at an early age, but infants are too young to complete the vaccination series. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 2012 rates of the disease are at their highest level in 50 years and some states are reporting case counts not seen since the 1930s, which was prior to the vaccine era.

"Because very young infants have not yet been vaccinated and are at the highest risk for severe disease, we need to better manage and treat it," said Erin Murray, lead author of the study and epidemiologist at the California Department of Public Health. "This study shows the importance of aggressive pediatric intensive care and provides us additional metrics as we treat these very young patients."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Erin L. Murray, Delma Nieves, John S. Bradley, Jessie Gargas, Wilbert H. Mason, Deborah Lehman, Kathleen Harriman, and James D. Cherry. Characteristics of Severe Bordetella pertussis Infection Among Infants ≤90 Days of Age Admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Units – Southern California, September 2009–June 2011. Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, 2013; DOI: 10.1093/jpids/pis105

Cite This Page:

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. "Study identifies infants at highest risk of death from pertussis; Early and repeated white blood cell counts are a critical tool." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110094752.htm>.
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. (2013, January 10). Study identifies infants at highest risk of death from pertussis; Early and repeated white blood cell counts are a critical tool. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110094752.htm
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. "Study identifies infants at highest risk of death from pertussis; Early and repeated white blood cell counts are a critical tool." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110094752.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins