Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Streaming video over temporary networks

Date:
January 29, 2013
Source:
The Research Council of Norway
Summary:
There are extra challenges when accidents occur in hard-to-reach locations such as in a tunnel or impassable mountain terrain where no stable computer networks are found. For the past ten years, however, technology for mobile ad hoc networks that enable rescue workers to communicate with one another or with a command control centre has been available. These networks configure themselves automatically among mobile devices located within a given geographic area.

There are extra challenges when accidents occur in hard-to-reach locations such as in a tunnel or impassable mountain terrain where no stable computer networks are found. For the past ten years, however, technology for mobile ad hoc networks that enable rescue workers to communicate with one another or with a command control centre has been available. These networks configure themselves automatically among mobile devices located within a given geographic area.

Video streaming crucial

The ability to stream video from the site of an emergency to the command centre will in many cases be essential. Today, there are a number of quality solutions for mounting cameras to helmets or integrating them into eyewear. While there are thus no longer the same obstacles to recording video, streaming it is another story. Existing mobile ad hoc networks lack the stability and the bandwidth to be reliable for transmitting video.

However, smart phones of today are ubiquitous and have become so powerful that they can be integrated in temporary emergency networks, providing a platform for efficient video transmission.

Developing software for multimedia data

Professor Thomas Plagemann of the Department of Informatics at the University of Oslo is heading a research group working with what are known as Delay Tolerant Streaming Services (DT-Stream) systems. This is a type of network that tolerates disruptions and delays, in contrast to the Internet, for example.

Dr Plagemann and the rest of his team have studied what it will take to enable a mobile ad hoc network to manage relatively large amounts of multimedia data, such as video, adequately in emergency and rescue operations.

Can connect to permanent emergency network

Some of the criticism being levied against the new Norwegian emergency network currently under development is that during its initial phase it can not handle either photo files or video. Connecting via a mobile ad hoc network is one possible approach to solving this.

"First and foremost, we are concentrating on transmitting multimedia data over mobile ad hoc networks with an eye to use in emergency and rescue operations in areas with no permanent data infrastructure. Of course, it will also be possible to connect to the Internet or the Norwegian digital communication network for emergency and public safety (Nψdnett)," says Dr Plagemann.

From pieces of the puzzle to solution

With funding from the large-scale programme "Core Competence and Value Creation in ICT" (VERDIKT) at the Research Council of Norway, Dr Plagemann's research group has reached the point where they have partial solutions ready for use. The next step is to put these pieces of the puzzle together into a complete application.

The work of Thomas Plagemann's group is drawing attention from research circles around the world. An article summing up the state-of-the-art in video transmission in mobile and ad-hoc networks was at the top of the list of articles downloaded most from the periodical, Multimedia Systems Journal in 2011 and 2012.

Breaking programming rules -- more efficient

One of the solutions developed by the Norwegian researchers came into being as a result of violating some of the classical engineering principles of network programming. Instead, the researchers have utilised a process called cross-layer optimisation.

Network systems today are highly complex. In connection with testing and development, programmers divide them up into separate layers in order to simplify the work. The result is a stack composed of several layers.

The bottom layer is the physical layer, i.e. whether it is a wireless, cable or fibre-optic network. Above this is a data linking layer that transmits bits from one computer to another. On the top is the network layer where operations such as running Internet protocols are carried out.

The rule in network programming is to address only the layer directly beneath the layer being worked on. Dr Plagemann's group has developed middleware that processes all the various layers simultaneously.

"We don't want the applications programmer to have to worry about where the data are being sent or what type of device or operating system is in use. This is all hidden away in our middleware," Thomas Plagemann explains. The middleware reduces data loss in the network, saves energy and improves data-transmission speeds.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Research Council of Norway. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Research Council of Norway. "Streaming video over temporary networks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129075618.htm>.
The Research Council of Norway. (2013, January 29). Streaming video over temporary networks. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129075618.htm
The Research Council of Norway. "Streaming video over temporary networks." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130129075618.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) — Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) — 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Facebook Earnings Put Smile on Investors Faces

Facebook Earnings Put Smile on Investors Faces

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — Facebook earnings beat forecasts- with revenue climbing 61 percent. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
StubHub Caught in Global Cyber Crime Ring

StubHub Caught in Global Cyber Crime Ring

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — eBay's StubHub is caught up in an international cyber crime ring stretching from North America to Europe. Conway G. Gittens reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins