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How cancer cells rewire their metabolism to survive

Date:
January 31, 2013
Source:
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Summary:
Many scientists have tried killing tumors by taking away their favorite food, a sugar called glucose. Unfortunately, this treatment approach not only fails to work, it backfires--glucose-starved tumors get more aggressive. In a new study, researchers discovered that the protein PKCz is responsible for this paradox. The research suggests that glucose depletion therapies might work, as long as the cancer cells produce PKCz.

Cells proliferating in an intestinal tumor.
Credit: Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Researchers have discovered that tumors lacking the protein PKCζ are good at surviving when nutrients are scarce -- opening a new therapeutic avenue that targets cancer metabolism.

Cancer cells need food to survive and grow. They're very good at getting it, too, even when nutrients are scarce. Many scientists have tried killing cancer cells by taking away their favorite food, a sugar called glucose. Unfortunately, this treatment approach not only fails to work, it backfires -- glucose-starved tumors actually get more aggressive. In a study published January 31 in the journal Cell, researchers discovered that a protein called PKCζ is responsible for this paradox. The research suggests that glucose depletion therapies might work against tumors as long as the cancer cells are producing PKCζ.

PKCζ: critical regulator of tumor metabolism

According to this study, when PKCζ is missing from cancer cells, tumors are able to use alternative nutrients. What's more, the lower the PKCζ levels, the more aggressive the tumor.

"We found an interesting correlation in colon cancers -- if a patient's tumor doesn't produce PKCζ, he has a poorer prognosis than a similar patient with the protein. We looked specifically at colon cancer in this study, but it's likely also true for other tumor types," said Jorge Moscat, Ph.D., a professor at Sanford-Burnham. Moscat led the study in close collaboration with colleague Maria Diaz-Meco, Ph.D.

PKCζ keeps tumors addicted to glucose, and under control

Although most cancer cells love glucose, tumors lacking PKCζ grow even better in the absence of this nutrient. Using human tumor samples and a mouse model of colon cancer, Moscat and his team determined this growth-without-glucose paradox is because PKCζ-deficient tumors are able to reprogram their metabolism to use glutamine, another nutrient, instead.

Without PKCζ around to keep them addicted to glucose, these tumors kick-start a new metabolic pathway. This altered metabolism helps PKCζ-deficient cancer cells survive in conditions that would otherwise be lethal.

"If we can find an effective way to add PKCζ back to tumors that lack it, we'd make them less suited for survival and more sensitive to current therapies," Moscat said.

This study was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health -- National Cancer Institute grants R01CA132847, R01CA134530, R21CA147978 and 5P30CA030199-31; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases grant R01AI072581; and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases grant R01DK088107.

The study was co-authored by Li Ma, Sanford-Burnham; Yongzhen Tao, Sanford-Burnham; Angeles Duran, Sanford-Burnham; Victoria Llado, Sanford-Burnham; Anita Galvez, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Jennifer F.Barger, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Elias A. Castilla, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Jing Chen, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Tomoko Yajima, Sanford-Burnham; Aleksey Porollo, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Mario Medvedovic, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Laurence M. Brill, Sanford-Burnham; David R. Plas, University of Cincinnati Medical College; Stefan J. Riedl, Sanford-Burnham; Michael Leitges, University of Oslo; Maria T. Diaz-Meco, Sanford-Burnham; Adam D. Richardson, Sanford-Burnham; and Jorge Moscat, Sanford-Burnham.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. The original article was written by Heather Buschman. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Li Ma, Yongzhen Tao, Angeles Duran, Victoria Llado, Anita Galvez, JenniferF. Barger, EliasA. Castilla, Jing Chen, Tomoko Yajima, Aleksey Porollo, Mario Medvedovic, LaurenceM. Brill, DavidR. Plas, StefanJ. Riedl, Michael Leitges, MariaT. Diaz-Meco, AdamD. Richardson, Jorge Moscat. Control of Nutrient Stress-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming by PKCζ in Tumorigenesis. Cell, 2013; 152 (3): 599 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.12.028

Cite This Page:

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. "How cancer cells rewire their metabolism to survive." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130131144427.htm>.
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. (2013, January 31). How cancer cells rewire their metabolism to survive. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130131144427.htm
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. "How cancer cells rewire their metabolism to survive." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130131144427.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

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