Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New approach to psychosis treatment could target multiple nervous system receptors

Date:
February 1, 2013
Source:
Biophysical Society
Summary:
A new understanding of how the brain’s G-protein receptors work may soon enable a way to better customize and target antipsychotic drugs to treat specific symptoms.

Antipsychotic drugs, used in the treatment of psychotic disorders involving severe delusions and hallucinations, have been studied for more than 70 years. Currently available antipsychotic drugs, however, only alleviate certain symptoms, with results that vary greatly from patient to patient and frequently cause significant side effects.

Related Articles


A new understanding of how the brain's G-protein receptors work may soon enable a way to better customize and target antipsychotic drugs to treat specific symptoms. Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) will present their findings at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society (BPS), held Feb. 2-6, 2013, in Philadelphia, Pa.

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for activating so-called "G-proteins," internal signaling messengers that control the activity of many other internal proteins. The starring role of GPCRs in regulating a cell's activity makes them a leading pharmaceutical target: approximately 50 percent of the antipsychotic drugs produced are aimed at these important nervous system receptors.

A specific GPCR is integral to each of three key pathways for intercellular signaling, one for each of the chemical messengers dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate. But these individual GPCRs also form complexes with each other, altering their effects on signaling in the brain. The VCU team has focused on how GPCR complexes influence signaling in a distinct way from how individual GPCRs operate.

"The realization that receptors in the brain that bind and interpret dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate neurotransmitters form complexes with one another that signal very differently than when these receptors are found in isolation, promises to change the way we approach treatment of psychosis," explains VCU Ph.D. candidate Jason Younkin, who will present the team's findings.

Instead of targeting one neurotransmitter pathway at a time, Younkin and colleagues plan to target two or more at the same time. Antipsychotic drugs that target the complexes formed by the individual GPCRs will allow use of the signaling differences and could lead to more effective therapies.

"By understanding how receptor complexes signal and learning how to control these signals, it should enable the development of specific antipsychotic drugs that lack the many side effects that exist today," says VCU professor Diomedes E. Logothetis, a co-author of the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Biophysical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Biophysical Society. "New approach to psychosis treatment could target multiple nervous system receptors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130201095931.htm>.
Biophysical Society. (2013, February 1). New approach to psychosis treatment could target multiple nervous system receptors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130201095931.htm
Biophysical Society. "New approach to psychosis treatment could target multiple nervous system receptors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130201095931.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins