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Fungus uses copper detoxification as crafty defense mechanism

Date:
March 14, 2013
Source:
Duke University Medical Center
Summary:
A potentially lethal fungal infection appears to gain virulence by being able to anticipate and disarm a hostile immune attack in the lungs, according to a new article.

Cryptococcus neoformans cells in the lungs of live mice. The C. neoformans cells contain a gene that is expressed only when the cells encounter high levels of copper and expression of the gene is detected as the appearance of colors in live animal imaging studies.
Credit: Image courtesy of Duke University Medical Center

A potentially lethal fungal infection appears to gain virulence by being able to anticipate and disarm a hostile immune attack in the lungs, according to findings by researchers at Duke Medicine.

Defense mechanisms used by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans enable it to lead to fatal meningitis, which is one of the opportunistic infections often associated with death in HIV/AIDS patients or in organ transplant recipients, diabetics and other immunosuppressed patients. In describing the complex process of how C. neoformans averts destruction in the lungs of mice, the Duke researchers have opened new options for drug development.

"Very few antifungal drugs are effective, so we need to identify the Achilles' heel of these fungal pathogens," said Dennis J. Thiele, PhD, the George Barth Geller Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University. Thiele is senior author of a study published March 13, 2013, in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. "With this research we may be closer to understanding how this fungal pathogen evades death in its host, and hopefully be closer to finding effective treatments."

Found in the environment, C. neoformans spores can be inhaled and cause infection, particularly when people have weakened immune systems. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that worldwide, C. neoformans causes 1 million cases of meningitis a year among HIV/AIDS patients, with nearly 625,000 deaths.

Thiele and colleagues focused on the interplay between C. neoformans in the lungs of mice and the host's immune system, which mounts an immediate attack against the pathogen.

The immune response is led by macrophages, which circulate in the blood stream and engulf invading microbes to destroy them. The macrophages are essentially tiny torture chambers for pathogens, using hostile conditions and toxic substances to kill invaders.

Among the substances inside the macrophages is copper, a mineral the body needs for normal cognitive function and development, but also known to have antifungal properties. In the face of a pathogenic invasion of fungal spores, the macrophages begin concentrating more copper within their torture chamber as one of the body's antifungal weapons.

The Duke researchers found that lethal strains of C. neoformans have two ways of battling against the toxicity of the copper. First, the pathogen turns on genes that make proteins to protect it from copper toxicity, so even when exposed to the hostile copper environment in the macrophages, it survives.

Then a second defense mechanism is also deployed. The fungus, sensing the copper-rich environment, triggers a response that shuts down the host's ability to pump more copper into the macrophages -- defusing this weapon in the immune system's arsenal.

"With these two mechanisms, C. neoformans can defend itself by sequestering the copper, and somehow communicate to the host macrophage, commanding that it shut down the copper pumps," Thiele said.

Thiele said studies are now focusing on how antifungal agents might thwart the pathogen's two defense systems. "The detoxification machinery might represent an effective drug target," Thiele said.

In addition to Thiele, study authors include Chen Ding, Richard A. Festa, Ying-Lien Chen and Joseph Heitman from Duke; Anna Espart and Sílvia Atrian from Universitat de Barcelona, Spain; Òscar Palacios, Jordi Espín and Mercè Capdevila from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

The work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (GM48140-24, 2P30 AI064518-06, AI50438).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Duke University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chen Ding, Richard A. Festa, Ying-Lien Chen, Anna Espart, Òscar Palacios, Jordi Espín, Mercè Capdevila, Sílvia Atrian, Joseph Heitman, Dennis J. Thiele. Cryptococcus neoformans Copper Detoxification Machinery Is Critical for Fungal Virulence. Cell Host & Microbe, 2013; 13 (3): 265 DOI: 10.1016/j.chom.2013.02.002

Cite This Page:

Duke University Medical Center. "Fungus uses copper detoxification as crafty defense mechanism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314141138.htm>.
Duke University Medical Center. (2013, March 14). Fungus uses copper detoxification as crafty defense mechanism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314141138.htm
Duke University Medical Center. "Fungus uses copper detoxification as crafty defense mechanism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314141138.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

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