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Plastic film is the future of 3-D on-the-go

Date:
April 2, 2013
Source:
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)
Summary:
Ditch the 3-D glasses. Thanks to a simple plastic filter, mobile device users can now view unprecedented, distortion-free, brilliant 3-D content with the naked eye. This latest innovation from TP and IMRE is the first ever glasses-free 3-D accessory that can display content in both portrait and landscape mode, and measures less than 0.1 mm in thickness.Mobile device users will soon be able to view brilliant 3-D content with the naked eye with a nano-engineered screen protector that turns ordinary mobile screens into 3-D displays. The unique plastic film can also potentially be used as next generation security tokens employed by banks and corporations.

The Singapore developed EyeFly3D unlocks 3D on-the-go fo mobile devices.
Credit: Copyright Temasek Polytechnic, Singapore

Mobile device users will soon be able to view brilliant 3D content with the naked eye with a nano-engineered screen protector that turns ordinary mobile screens into 3D displays. The unique plastic film can also potentially be used as next generation security tokens employed by banks and corporations.

Temasek Polytechnic (TP) and A*STAR's Institute of Materials Research and Engineering's (IMRE) new nano-engineered screen protector that turns the ordinary screens of handheld devices into 3D displays will be marketed by start-up, Nanoveu Pte Ltd. The unique plastic film can also potentially be used as next generation security tokens employed by banks and corporations.

Ditch the 3D glasses. Thanks to a simple plastic filter, mobile device users can now view unprecedented, distortion-free, brilliant 3D content with the naked eye. This latest innovation from TP and IMRE is the first ever glasses-free 3D accessory that can display content in both portrait and landscape mode, and measures less than 0.1 mm in thickness.

"The filter is essentially a piece of plastic film with about half a million perfectly shaped lenses engineered onto its surface using IMRE's proprietary nanoimprinting technology," said Dr Jaslyn Law, the IMRE scientist who worked with TP on the nanoimprinting R&D since 2010 to enhance the film's smoothness, clarity and transparency compared to other films in the market.

To complement the filter, the team developed applications for two software platforms, Apple iOS and Android, which allow users to play 3D content through its filter, in both landscape and portrait formats. The applications also allow 2D pictures taken using mobile devices to be converted into 3D. The team will be releasing a software development kit that enables game developers to convert their existing games into 3D versions.

The team is also exploring using the same technology for security access tokens to decode PIN numbers sent online as an inexpensive and portable alternative to rival bulkier and more expensive battery-operated security tokens, similar to those used by Singapore banks today.

"The team's expertise in both hardware and software development in 3D technology has enabled high quality 3D to be readily available to consumers," said Mr Frank Chan, the TP scientist who led the overall NRF-funded project. "We have taken age old lenticular lens technology that has been around for the last hundred years, modernised it and patented it using nanotechnology." Lenticular lens technology creates a transparent film that retains the brilliance of 3D visuals and effects, which does away with the need for stronger back lighting and saves on battery consumption in mobile devices.

The two-year project was initially funded under a National Research Foundation (NRF) Translational R&D Grant in Dec 2010 to look at optimising the control of the nanostructures and integrating its effects with the complementary software applications. The team has since shifted its focus towards commercialisation with support from Exploit Technologies Pte Ltd (ETPL), A*STAR's technology transfer arm and a one-stop resource that brings together home-grown technology, funding, collaboration and networks to assist A*STAR spin-offs and start-ups.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Plastic film is the future of 3-D on-the-go." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402090718.htm>.
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). (2013, April 2). Plastic film is the future of 3-D on-the-go. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402090718.htm
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Plastic film is the future of 3-D on-the-go." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402090718.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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