Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vitamin P as a potential approach for the treatment of damaged motor neurons

Date:
April 2, 2013
Source:
Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum
Summary:
Biologists in Germany have explored how to protect neurons that control movements from dying off. In a new paper, they report that the molecule 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone, also known as vitamin P, ensures the survival of motor neurons in culture. It sends the survival signal on another path than the molecule Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), which was previously considered a candidate for the treatment of motoneuron diseases or after spinal cord damage.

Biologists from the Ruhr-Universitδt Bochum have explored how to protect neurons that control movements from dying off. In the journal Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, they report that the molecule 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone, also known as vitamin P, ensures the survival of motor neurons in culture. It sends the survival signal on another path than the molecule Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), which was previously considered a candidate for the treatment of motoneuron diseases or after spinal cord damage.

"The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor only had a limited effect when tested on humans, and even had partially negative consequences," says Prof. Dr. Stefan Wiese from the RUB Work Group for Molecular Cell Biology. "Therefore we are looking for alternative ways to find new approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis."

Same effect, different mode of action

In previous studies, researchers hypothesised that vitamin P is an analogue of BDNF and thus works in the same way. This theory has been disproved by the team led by Dr. Teresa Tsai and Prof. Stefan Wiese from the Group for Molecular Cell Biology and the Department of Cell Morphology and Molecular Neurobiology headed by Prof. Andreas Faissner. Both substances ensure that isolated motor neurons of the mouse survive in cell culture and grow new processes, but what exactly the molecules trigger at the protein level varies. BDNF activates two signalling pathways, the so-called MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT signal paths. Vitamin P on the other hand makes use only of the latter.

The dose is crucial

However, vitamin P only unfolded its positive effects on the motor neurons in a very small concentration range.

"These results show how important an accurate determination of dose and effect is," says Prof. Wiese. An overdose of vitamin P reduced the survival effect, and over a certain amount, no more positive effects occurred at all. The researchers hope that vitamin P could have less negative side effects than BDNF. "It is easier to use, because vitamin P, in contrast to BDNF, can pass the blood-brain barrier and therefore does not have to be introduced into the cerebrospinal fluid using pumps like BDNF," says Wiese.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Teresa Tsai, Alice Klausmeyer, Rebecca Conrad, Christine Gottschling, Markus Leo, Andreas Faissner, Stefan Wiese. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone leads to survival of cultured embryonic motoneurons by activating intracellular signaling pathways. Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 2013; 56: 18 DOI: 10.1016/j.mcn.2013.02.007

Cite This Page:

Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum. "Vitamin P as a potential approach for the treatment of damaged motor neurons." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402101157.htm>.
Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum. (2013, April 2). Vitamin P as a potential approach for the treatment of damaged motor neurons. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402101157.htm
Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum. "Vitamin P as a potential approach for the treatment of damaged motor neurons." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402101157.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins