Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Eating solid food early sets marmosets on path to obesity

Date:
April 10, 2013
Source:
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Summary:
Baby marmoset monkeys that began eating solid food earlier than their peers were significantly more likely to be obese at one year of age, scientists have found.

Obese marmoset. Differences in the feeding behaviors of lean and obese marmoset infants were noted in a recent study.
Credit: Photo taken at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, by Lester Rosebrock.

Baby marmoset monkeys that began eating solid food earlier than their peers were significantly more likely to be obese at 1 year of age, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute found.

This early life obesity resulted in metabolic damage such as insulin resistance and poor blood sugar control, a companion study showed.

Marmosets on track for obesity appeared to be more efficient in their feeding behavior. "Although all animals consumed the same amount of liquid, the ones taking in more on each lick were the ones that later became obese," said Corinna Ross, Ph.D., lead author of one of the studies. Dr. Ross is instructor of cellular and structural biology in the School of Medicine of the Health Science Center and is based in the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies.

Model of early life obesity

"With its small size and early maturation, we think the marmoset is going to be an exceptionally good model of early life obesity and offers many opportunities to further explore why youngsters become obese and what interventions may work to counteract early life obesity," said senior author Suzette D. Tardif, Ph.D., associate professor of cellular and structural biology in the School of Medicine and director of the marmoset research program at the Barshop Institute. The studies were conducted at the Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio.

In previous studies, Dr. Tardif found that obesity patterns begin just 30 days after birth in the marmosets. A 30-day-old marmoset infant is the equivalent of a 5- to 8-month-old human infant. At 6 months of age, a marmoset is as old as a juvenile child before puberty. At a year old, the small non-human primate is the equivalent in age of a human adolescent.

The team monitored marmoset infant behaviors seven days a week to precisely document when each infant was weaned and ate its first solid food, Dr. Ross said. The team also observed 16 hours of liquid feeding using a device called a lickometer, as well as solid food feeding when the animals reached 3, 6 and 12 months old. Lickometer feeding mimics the way marmosets lick from sources in the wild, Dr. Ross said.

Metabolic damage

Both research articles are in the journal Obesity. The second paper, with Michael L. Power, Ph.D., of the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park as lead author, reports on the metabolic consequences of early life obesity in the marmosets.

"The paper Mike led reveals just how damaging the obesity is in marmosets," Dr. Tardif said. "By the time of adolescence, they're already insulin-resistant."

Marmosets have significantly less body fat than humans, but in the marmoset it takes considerably less fat to generate metabolic dysfunction, she noted.

Animals that are going to be normal weight gain lean mass, such as muscle, at a faster rate than they gain body fat. "That's true for human children, as well," Dr. Tardif said. But marmosets that became obese gained both fat mass and lean mass faster than their normal-weight counterparts. This meant that the obese animals' percentage of body fat grew during infancy and adolescence.

The study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK077639) to Suzette D. Tardif, Ph.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Corinna N. Ross, Michael L. Power, Joselyn M. Artavia, Suzette D. Tardif. Relation of food intake behaviors and obesity development in young common marmoset monkeys. Obesity, 2013; DOI: 10.1002/oby.20432
  2. Michael L. Power, Corinna N. Ross, Jay Schulkin, Toni E. Ziegler, Suzette D. Tardif. Metabolic consequences of the early onset of obesity in common marmoset monkeys. Obesity, 2013; DOI: 10.1002/oby.20462

Cite This Page:

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. "Eating solid food early sets marmosets on path to obesity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131455.htm>.
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. (2013, April 10). Eating solid food early sets marmosets on path to obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131455.htm
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. "Eating solid food early sets marmosets on path to obesity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131455.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the US from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

AFP (Oct. 22, 2014) Polish doctors describe how they helped a paralysed man walk again, with the patient in disbelief at the return of sensation to his legs. Duration: 1:04 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins