Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Reducing infant exposure to smoke

Date:
April 10, 2013
Source:
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Summary:
A study to investigate whether a hospital-initiated behavioral therapy program conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit can reduce secondhand smoke in homes with infants at risk for pulmonary problems has been launched by UTHealth researchers.

A study to investigate whether a hospital-initiated behavioral therapy program conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can reduce secondhand smoke in homes with infants at risk for pulmonary problems has been launched by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

The $2.2 million, five-year study will compare a more in-depth program to reduce infant secondhand smoke exposure with conventional care practices currently used in the Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital.

"People have a lot of misinformation," said Angela Stotts, Ph.D., associate professor and director of research in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the UTHealth Medical School. "They know that smoking is bad but not why. Secondhand smoke exposure leads to longer hospital stays, asthma, ear infections, respiratory infections and sudden infant death syndrome."

Stotts and fellow researchers will enroll a total of 396 low-income families who report a household smoker and have an infant at high respiratory risk in the NICU.

"Because smoking remains concentrated in less educated and impoverished communities, NICU families with household smokers are at significant risk for tobacco-related health disparities -- a substantial burden to families with limited resources and the communities in which they reside," Stotts wrote in the study's abstract.

Study participants are randomized to one of two groups and both receive the standard educational information about the dangers of secondhand smoke. Families in the more intensive program also have four one-hour counseling sessions -- two at the hospital and two at their home after discharge -- and incentives for attendance and establishing a home smoking ban. Infant urine cotinine tests and household air nicotine monitors will be used to assess secondhand smoke exposure.

"This will be the first study of an innovative combination of motivational strategies to discourage household secondhand smoke within the context of a NICU to improve the health of vulnerable infants and their families, potentially saving health care dollars," Stotts said.

The study is funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01HL107404), part of the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Reducing infant exposure to smoke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410191605.htm>.
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. (2013, April 10). Reducing infant exposure to smoke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410191605.htm
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Reducing infant exposure to smoke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410191605.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins