Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Migraine treatments and side-effects reviewed

Date:
April 17, 2013
Source:
Springer Science+Business Media
Summary:
A new review finds little difference between effectiveness of drugs routinely prescribed for migraine prevention but evident difference in the side-effects experienced. Migraine headaches are a major cause of ill health and a reduced quality of life. Some individuals suffer from a frequent and severe migraine problem which means that they require regular medication to try and prevent them. A new review of the medications may help to prevent episodic migraines.

A new review finds little difference between effectiveness of drugs routinely prescribed for migraine prevention but evident difference in the side-effects experienced.

Migraine headaches are a major cause of ill health and a reduced quality of life. Some individuals suffer from a frequent and severe migraine problem which means that they require regular medication to try and prevent them. A new review of the medications, which may help to prevent episodic migraines, appears in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer. The authors, Tatyana Shamliyan from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, and her colleagues, compare published research on the drugs available to find those which offer the best migraine prevention coupled with the fewest adverse side-effects.

Preventive treatments for migraines aim to reduce the number of migraines suffered by fifty percent. There are a number of different drugs commonly used, all of which may cause some side effects. The researchers carried out a review of studies which tested how well the different types of drugs worked and also their acceptability in terms of adverse effects suffered. The studies used enrolled mostly middle aged women with episodic migraine who suffered an average of five monthly migraine attacks.

The authors found that all approved drugs used in the reviewed trials worked better than placebo in reducing monthly migraine attacks. They all demonstrated similar effects in that they prevented half or more migraines in 200 to 400 patients per 1000 treated. Off-label anti-epilpetics and anti-depressants appeared to cause the most bothersome side effects which usually resulted in the medication being stopped. Off-label beta-blockers and angiotensin-inhibiting drugs caused the fewest side-effects. (Off-label drugs are drugs which have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a specific condition).

The American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society currently recommend two types of anti-epileptic drug and two beta-blockers for adult migraine prevention. These guidelines do not consider the balance between the effectiveness and harms of the drugs they recommend. As well as the increased occasion of immediate side effects with anti-epileptics, there is also evidence from other studies that with long-term use they can cause sexual problems such as impotence which would also deter long-term adherence..

Shamliyan and her colleagues suggest that future studies should examine the effects of the approved as well as the off-label drugs, taking into consideration patient demographics, family history of migraine, other illnesses and response to prior treatments. They also suggest that vigilance should be increased to monitor any adverse effects of current migraine-preventing drugs. Only once the necessary evidence is available, will migraine sufferers be given the best possible hope of a better quality of life with a preventive treatment that is more pro than con.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer Science+Business Media. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tatyana A. Shamliyan, Jae-Young Choi, Rema Ramakrishnan, Jennifer Biggs Miller, Shi-Yi Wang, Frederick R. Taylor, Robert L. Kane. Preventive Pharmacologic Treatments for Episodic Migraine in Adults. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2013; DOI: 10.1007/s11606-013-2433-1

Cite This Page:

Springer Science+Business Media. "Migraine treatments and side-effects reviewed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130417114013.htm>.
Springer Science+Business Media. (2013, April 17). Migraine treatments and side-effects reviewed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130417114013.htm
Springer Science+Business Media. "Migraine treatments and side-effects reviewed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130417114013.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins