Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Warning system predicts outbreaks of dengue fever

Date:
April 29, 2013
Source:
Ume universitet
Summary:
With the help of a warning system which measures the risk of dengue incidence using precipitation and air temperature, it is possible to forecast the outbreak of dengue fever up to 16 weeks in advance.

With the help of a warning system which measures the risk of dengue incidence using precipitation and air temperature, it is possible to forecast the outbreak of dengue fever up to 16 weeks in advance.

Related Articles


This is what Yien Ling Hii concludes in the dissertation she is defending at Ume University in Sweden on 3 May.

Dengue fever is an infectious disease caused by virus and transmitted to persons by mosquitoes. A person contracted dengue fever usually shows symptoms including sudden spike of high fever, muscle ache, joint pain, rashes, and headache. An infected person normally recovers within a few weeks, but a small per cent of patients can develop fatal complications such as plasma leakage, severe bleeding, and severe organ impairments which can lead to death.

To date, there is no drug for treatment or vaccines to protect against dengue fever. Therefore, the most effective way to prevent dengue is to control the mosquito population.

Dengue fever is widespread in more than 100 countries in the tropical and subtropical regions, where climate is warm and wet. In recent years, dengue fever has also become a threat in the southern Europe since a species of mosquitoes that is capable of spreading dengue has been found in the region. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control has reported more than a thousand dengue cases in Madeira in the outbreak in 2012. Dengue cases were also reported in France and Croatia in 2010.

Temperature and rainfall directly influence the biological development of mosquitoes. Higher temperature can accelerate mosquito development stages and increase dengue transmission; while rainfall produces more breeding sites for mosquitoes.

According to the study carried out by Yien Ling Hii using data from Singapore, higher risk of dengue cases can occur in 3-4 months after favourable temperature and rainfall conditions take place. A statistical forecasting model was developed to estimate the risk of dengue outbreak in this period to provide an early warning that allows sufficient time for response. The forecasting model is sensitive to detect dengue outbreaks and non-outbreaks with up to twenty per cent chance of false alarm.

"An early warning of disease outbreak can help local authorities and community to implement preventive measures such as eliminating mosquito breeding habitats to control or even prevent the outbreak from happening," says Yien Ling Hii.

Thesis abstract: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-68040


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ume universitet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ume universitet. "Warning system predicts outbreaks of dengue fever." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429095052.htm>.
Ume universitet. (2013, April 29). Warning system predicts outbreaks of dengue fever. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429095052.htm
Ume universitet. "Warning system predicts outbreaks of dengue fever." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429095052.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins