Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Big data analysis identifies prognostic RNA markers in a common form of breast cancer

Date:
April 29, 2013
Source:
Ohio State University Medical Center
Summary:
An analysis that integrates three large sets of genomic data available through The Cancer Genome Atlas has identified 37 RNA molecules that might predict survival in patients with the most common form of breast cancer. The study analyzed large masses of data from 466 cases of the most common type of breast cancer and provides the first prognostic signature in cancer composed of both mRNA and microRNA.

A Big-Data analysis that integrates three large sets of genomic data available through The Cancer Genome Atlas has identified 37 RNA molecules that might predict survival in patients with the most common form of breast cancer.

Related Articles


The study by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James) initially analyzed messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA expression, DNA methylation data and clinical findings for 466 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common type of breast cancer.

The analysis identified 30 mRNAs and seven microRNAs -- short snippets of RNA -- that were consistently associated with patient outcome across 44 clinical and molecular subclasses, including early-stage tumors. The researchers then validated the prognostic signature using genome-wide expression data from 2,399 breast-cancer patients in eight independent groups and found that it performed better than other RNA signatures currently used for breast-cancer risk stratification.

"This is the first prognostic signature in breast cancer or other type of cancer that combines both mRNA and microRNA," says first author and researcher Dr. Stefano Volinia, associate professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics at the OSUCCC -- James, "and we believe this concise RNA signature could prove useful for the clinical management of breast-cancer patients."

Principal investigator Dr. Carlo M. Croce, professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics, and director of Human Cancer Genetics, notes that most of the genes involved in the RNA signature have not previously been linked to breast cancer and that unlike many other prognostic signatures, this one does not contain genes involved in the cell cycle or tumor grade.

"Most of these prognostic genes are newcomers, and therefore they might represent novel drug targets," says Croce, who is also the John W. Wolfe Chair in Human Cancer Genetics. "They also are novel genes with unknown function and need further study."

He noted that these genes could also be candidates for a blood test for early detection.

Key points related to the study's findings include:

  • The identified RNA signature might predict response to treatment, as well as being prognostic;
  • DNA methylation was used to confirm the association between mRNA expression and overall survival;
  • The signature includes mutations in PIK3CA and its pathway, indicating that the PIK3CA/AKT2/PTEN axis is an important and independent cofactor in prognosis;
  • The prognostic value of the integrated signature was highest in early stage I and II breast cancers, making this a potentially valuable biomarker signature in clinical practice.

Funding from the NIH/National Cancer Institute (grant CA 152758-03) and the Italian Association for Cancer Research (AIRC) supported this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Volinia, C. M. Croce. Prognostic microRNA/mRNA signature from the integrated analysis of patients with invasive breast cancer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1304977110

Cite This Page:

Ohio State University Medical Center. "Big data analysis identifies prognostic RNA markers in a common form of breast cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429154109.htm>.
Ohio State University Medical Center. (2013, April 29). Big data analysis identifies prognostic RNA markers in a common form of breast cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429154109.htm
Ohio State University Medical Center. "Big data analysis identifies prognostic RNA markers in a common form of breast cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429154109.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins